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English Courses

The English department at College of DuPage offers many areas of study, including Creative Writing, Film, Literature and Writing Studies. Each program has a unique set of courses with their own focus and approach, but all of the English programs provide high-demand 21st century skills like communication, collaboration and problem solving. 

First-Year Writing

ENGLI 1101 (IAI C1 900): English Composition I

Introduces key concepts in rhetoric and writing, including situation and context, audience, genre, purpose, and persuasion. Students apply these concepts in writing projects that demonstrate how reading and writing are embedded in multi-faceted academic, personal, social, political, and/or professional purposes. These writing projects unfold through a deliberate process of inquiry, feedback, and revision.

Prerequisite: ENGLI 0492 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or ENGLI 0493 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or ELS 0553 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent, or appropriate score on guided self-placement questionnaire, or co-requisite of ENGLI 0493 (must be enrolled in linked section taught by the same instructor - these are defined pairs). Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • This class is offered in both NET and F2F formats and in a variety of summer sessions: 1st 5 week, 8 week, and 2nd 5 week. For a complete list of all sections of ENGLI 1101 being offered in Summer 2022, please check myACCESS.

ENGLI 1102 (IAI C1 901R): English Composition II

Builds upon the rhetoric, reading, and writing concepts introduced in English Composition I by having students compose inquiry-driven research projects. In their research process, students find and select the most appropriate sources to address research questions that are intended for a discourse community. Students integrate sources meaningfully for support and present their findings via the forms of media and genre that suit the project's objectives.

Prerequisite: ENGLI 1101 with a grade of C or better.

  • This class is offered in both NET and F2F formats  and in a variety of summer sessions: 1st 5 week, 8 week, and 2nd 5 week. For a complete list of all sections of ENGLI 1102 being offered in Summer 2022 please, check myACCESS.

Fall 2022 Courses

The following courses will be offered during the summer. Students can search for class and register by visiting Student Planning from myaccess.cod.edu

ENGLI 2210: Prairie Light Review

An experiential course that applies editorial and publication techniques to produce college district literary journal. Includes acquisitions, copy editing, and marketing aspects of publishing. This course may be taken four times for credit. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours) Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Thursday 1 to 3:50 p.m. | Professor Adam Fotos

ENGLI 2250: Introduction to Creative Writing

Students discover and develop their writing talent in several genres, including fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and dramatic writing. Emphasis is on the workshop model in which students provide and receive input on works written for class. This course emphasizes the craft of writing with attention to brainstorming, drafting, and revising as important stages of the writing process. Through analysis of published works, and the production of their own original works, students learn to use language creatively to achieve desired effects. They further consider how intention and audience guide creative choices. Students will explore how creative writing allows for the expression of many multicultural perspectives and how creative works help writers and readers to learn about themselves and the world around them. (3 lecture hours)

  • Tuesday, Thursday 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. | Professor Tony Bowers
  • Tuesday 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Professor Trina Sotirakopulos
  • Monday, Wednesday 11 to 11:50 a.m. | Professor Jason Snart
  • Online (12 week) | Professor Trina Sotirakopulos
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Deborah Adelman  

ENGLI 2251: Fiction Writing

Students discover and develop their fiction writing talent. Emphasis is on the workshop model in which students provide and receive input on fiction written for class. This course emphasizes the craft of fiction writing with attention to brainstorming, drafting, and revising as important stages of the writing process. Through analysis of published works of fiction, and the production of their own original works of fiction, students learn to use language creatively to achieve desired effects. They further consider how intention and audience guide creative choices. Students will explore how fiction writing allows for the expression of many multicultural perspectives and how creative works help writers and readers to learn about themselves and the world around them. (3 lecture hours)

  • Monday, Wednesday 1 to 2:15 p.m. | Professor Tony Bowers

ENGLI 2261: Writing for Publication

This course teaches students how to analyze publishing markets and how to understand important aspects of publication, including query letters, agents, manuscript preparation, and marketing/promotion. As part of learning about how to publish creative work, students also hone their craft as creative writers, learning to use language creatively to achieve desired effects while considering how intention and audience guide creative choices. Students produce original work that is intended for particular publishing outlets. In developing original work for publication, students learn how creative writing allows for the expression of many multicultural perspectives and how creative works help writers and readers to learn about themselves and the world around them. (3 lecture hours) Prerequisite: ENGLI 2210, ENGLI 2250, ENGLI 2251, ENGLI 2252, or ENGLI 2253 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score Category 1.

  • Online (16 week) | Professor Trina Sotirakopulos

ENGLI 1135 (IAI F2 908): Introduction to Film Art

Introduces the basic elements of film as an art form, including cinematography, mise-en-scene, movement, editing, and sound. Social and media contexts of film will also be considered. Through screening, discussion, and critical evaluation of selected films, students develop an ability to interpret cinema through close examination of the relationship between its form and content. Credit cannot be earned for both ENGLI 1135 and MPTV 1135. Pre-Enrollment Criteria: Reading Placement Category 1. (3 lecture hours)

  • Monday 9 to 11:50 a.m. | Professor Deborah Adelman
  •  Monday 6:30 to 9:20 p.m. | Professor Jessica Huth
  • Online (1st 8 week) | Professor Michelle Moore
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Michelle Moore
  • VCM Thursday 9:30 to 10:45 p.m. | Professor Sandy Fries
  • VCM Wednesday 1 to 2:15 p.m. | Professor Sandy Fries
  • "Movie Magic" Field Studies (1st 8 week) Tuesday 1 p.m. to 3:50 p.m. | Professor Marco Benassi
  • "Movie Magic" Field Studies (2nd 8 week) Tuesday 1 p.m. to 3:50 p.m. | Professor Marco Benassi
  • "Seed, Soil and the Soul: Food Justice for a Sustainable Future" Field Studies Learning Community Tuesday 11 a.m. to 1:50 p.m. | Professor Deborah Adelman

ENGLI 1145 (IAI F2 909): Film History

Explores the history of film through articulating the evolution of cinema from its inception to the modern era, with emphasis placed on social, historical, and economic contexts that shape changes in film. Through examining a variety of American and international films representing many eras, genres, and filmmakers, students will gain insight into the historical narratives that have shaped film as a mass medium. Credit cannot be earned for both ENGLI 1145 and MPTV 1145. Pre-Enrollment Criteria: Reading Placement Category 1. (3 lecture hours)

  • Wednesday 9 to 11:50 a.m. | Professor Brian Brems
  • Tuesday 6 to 8:50 p.m. | Professor J. Haden
  • Wednesday 1 to 2:15 p.m. | Professor Brian Brems
  • Monday 1 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. | Professor J. Haden
  • Online (1st 8 week) | Professor Brian Brems
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Brian Brems

ENGLI 1154 (IAI HF 908): Film As Literature

Explores the process of film adaptation from a variety of sources. Includes examination of films adapted directly and indirectly from prior media, as well as an overview of theoretical approaches to studying film adaptation. Through close study of selected films, students will develop a nuanced, open approach to considering the process of adaptation on screen. Credit cannot be earned for both ENGLI 1154 and MPTV 1154. Pre-Enrollment Criteria: Reading Placement Category 1. (3 lecture hours)

  • Friday 9 to 11:50 a.m. | Professor Jacinta Yanders
  • Wednesday 6:30 to 9:20 p.m. | Professor Jessica Huth
  •  Tuesday 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Professor Jessica Huth
  • Thursday 1 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. | Professor Brian Brems
  • Online (1st 8 week) | Professor Brian Brems
  • Online (16 week) | Professor Michelle Moore
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Deborah Adelman

ENGLI 1130 (IAI H3 900): Introduction to Literature

Introduces students to the artistic complexity, depth, and nuance of literature and develops the important skills of critical thinking and effective communication. Students analyze literary works from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine literature with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works at the time of publication and beyond. Students explore how literature can reflect, but also challenge, cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9 to 9:50 a.m. | Professor Tom Tipton
  • Tuesday, Thursday 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. | Professor Tim Henningsen
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Melina Martin

ENGLI 1150 (IAI H3 901): Short Fiction

Introduces students to short fiction's artistic complexity, unique formal elements, depth, and nuance and develops the important skills of critical thinking and effective communication. Students study short fiction from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine short fiction with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works at the time of publication and beyond. Students explore how individual works of short fiction can reflect, but also challenge, cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Tuesday, Thursday 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. | Professor Tony Bowers
  • Monday, Wednesday noon to 12:50 p.m. | Professor Tony Bowers
  • Online (12 week) | Professor Jackie McGrath
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Jackie McGrath
  • Online (2nd 5 week) | Professor Bonnie McLean

ENGLI 1152 (IAI H3 903): Poetry

Introduces students to the artistic complexity, unique formal elements, depth, and nuance of poetry and develops the important skills of critical thinking and effective communication. Students analyze poetry from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice analysis and argumentation. Students examine poetry with reference to how publication and reception influence poetic works at the time of publication and beyond. Students explore how poetry can reflect but also challenge cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Online (12 week) | Professor Jason Snart

ENGLI 1157 (IAI H3 918): Children's Literature

Introduces students to the artistic qualities of literature for children and adolescents to develop students' critical thinking and effective communication skills. Students study children's literature and adolescent literature from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts, in order to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis of works from many genres of children's literature and adolescent literature and they consider the relationship between literacy and literature. Students examine literature both for children and adolescents with reference to how creation, publication, and reception influence those works at the time of creation and beyond. Students also explore how children's literature and adolescent literature can reflect, but also challenge, social norms, especially how children's literature and adolescent literature reflects and shapes any culture's understanding of children and childhood. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Online (12 week) | Professor Latrice Ferguson
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Latrice Ferguson

ENGLI 1159 (IAI H9 901)

Introduces students to the artistic complexity, unique formal elements, depth, and cultural relevance of Greek mythology as represented in both Classical and contemporary literature. Students develop critical thinking and effective communication skills. Students build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning by considering Greek mythology. Students explore how works of Greek mythology can reflect but also challenge cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours) Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Monday, Wednesday 1 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. | Professor Lisa Higgins

ENGLI 1160 (H3 910D): Native American Literature

Introduces students to Native American mythology, oratory, poetry, short fiction, nonfiction, and novel literature from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Students develop the important skills of critical thinking and effective communication. Students analyze Native American literature to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine Native American literature with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works at the time of publication and beyond. Students explore how individual works of Native American literature can reflect, but also challenge, cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours) Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  •  Monday 6:30 to 9:20 p.m. | Professor Jackie McGrath

ENGLI 2220 (H3 912)
British Literature to 1800

A survey of works illustrating the development of British literature from Old English and Middle English to 1800. Individual works are analyzed for artistic complexity, depth, and nuance as students refine critical thinking and effective communication skills. Diverse literary works from the British tradition up to 1800 will be studied to build students' cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine British literature with reference to how conditions of production/publication, dissemination, and reception influence literary works and for how literary traditions and/or movements are formed and how they change. Students explore how literature from this time period can reflect but also challenge cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

  •  Monday, Wednesday 10 to 11:55 a.m. | Professor Tom Tipton

ENGLI 2262 (H3 908N)
Non-Western Literature

A survey of literature that represents Non-Western cultures, authors, and themes. Individual works are analyzed for artistic complexity, depth, and nuance as students refine critical thinking and effective communication skills. Diverse literary works from various Non-Western literary traditions will be studied to build students' cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine texts from literary traditions outside the Western canon with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works at the time of publication and beyond, how their literary tradition determines their status in Western cultures, and how literary traditions and/or movements are formed and change. Students explore how literature reflects but also challenges cultural, social, and literary norms of the culture in which it is written as well as of Western cultures. Students identify the problematic term Non-Western as a false binary between the West and the rest of the world and the oversimplification and generalization of this genre. (3 lecture hours)

  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Melina Martin

ENGLI 1105: Workplace Writing

Course focuses on the processes and strategies for creating various modes of communication within a workplace setting. Students will gain skills in assessing and addressing various audiences, observing stylistic conventions, and using appropriate elements of document design to communicate effectively. The course emphasizes the preparation of a variety of documents, such as resumes, letters of application, internal and external correspondence, descriptions, proposals, summaries, and reports. It also introduces strategies for conducting research and observing copyright.

Prerequisite: ENGLI 0492 Approaches to College Writing II with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or Prerequisite: ELS 0553 Academic ESL Writing III with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or Appropriate score on the Writing Placement Test(s). Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Professor Elizabeth Cicchetti
  • Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10 to 10:50 a.m.| Professor Elizabeth Cicchetti
  • Tuesday, Thursday 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. | Professor Jim Allen
  • Tuesday 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. | Professor Auggie Morado
  • Thursday 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. | Professor Auggie Morado
  • Online (1st 8 week) | Professor Kim Groves
  • Online (16 week) | Professor Jill Grauman
  • Online (12 week) | Professor Jill Grauman
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Annie Schnarr

ENGLI 1110: Technical Writing

An introduction to technical writing with an overview of key issues such as usability, audience analysis, designing pages and digital screens, effective collaboration with peers, researching, interpreting and ethically presenting data, and writing clearly and persuasively. Also includes instruction in writing, revising, and presenting common technical writing genres, which could include emails, instructions, tutorials, manuals, reports, product/process descriptions, proposals, and presentations using visual aids.

Prerequisite: ENGLI 0492 Approaches to College Writing II with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or ELS 0553 Academic ESL Writing III with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or appropriate score on the Writing Placement Test(s). Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Online (12 week) | Professor Jillian Grauman

ENGLI  2105: Writing in the Professions

An in-depth study of writing in the professions, exploring the structure and format of professional writing documents and how these documents function as a communicative tool. Provides a solid foundation upon which students can build as they develop specializations in their professional fields. Special attention will be paid to the rhetoric of professional writing and professional writing issues in professional settings. Includes instruction in rhetoric, research, and writing professional documents such as reports, proposals, and presentations. (3 lecture hours) Prerequisite: ENGLI 1102 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in ENGLI 1102 or consent of instructor.

  • Online (12 week) | Professor Jill Grauman

ENGLI  2200: Argumentative Writing

A study of the written argument, an essential form of communication circulating everywhere today, in print and on screens, to clarify ideas, form consensus, promote values, and gain political and social power. Students will read rhetorical theorists and analyze written arguments before crafting and circulating their own written arguments. (3 lecture hours)

  • Online | Professor Jill Grauman