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English Courses

The English department at College of DuPage offers many areas of study, including Creative Writing, Film, Literature and Writing Studies. Each program has a unique set of courses with their own focus and approach, but all of the English programs provide high-demand 21st century skills like communication, collaboration and problem solving. 

First-Year Writing

ENGLI 1101 (IAI C1 900): English Composition I

Introduces key concepts in rhetoric and writing, including situation and context, audience, genre, purpose, and persuasion. Students apply these concepts in writing projects that demonstrate how reading and writing are embedded in multi-faceted academic, personal, social, political, and/or professional purposes. These writing projects unfold through a deliberate process of inquiry, feedback, and revision.

Prerequisite: ENGLI 0492 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or ENGLI 0493 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or ELS 0553 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent, or appropriate score on guided self-placement questionnaire, or co-requisite of ENGLI 0493 (must be enrolled in linked section taught by the same instructor - these are defined pairs). Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • This class is offered in many different formats, including fully online and F2F, in a variety of sessions: 1st 8 week, 2nd 8 week, 12 week and 16 week. For a complete list of all sections of ENGLI 1101 being offered in Spring 2023, please check myACCESS.

ENGLI 1102 (IAI C1 901R): English Composition II

Builds upon the rhetoric, reading, and writing concepts introduced in English Composition I by having students compose inquiry-driven research projects. In their research process, students find and select the most appropriate sources to address research questions that are intended for a discourse community. Students integrate sources meaningfully for support and present their findings via the forms of media and genre that suit the project's objectives.

Prerequisite: ENGLI 1101 with a grade of C or better.

  • This class is offered in many different formats, including fully online and F2F, in a variety of sessions: 1st 8 week, 2nd 8 week, 12 week and 16 week. For a complete list of all sections of ENGLI 1102 being offered in Spring 2023, please check myACCESS.

Spring 2023 Courses

The following courses will be offered in Spring 2023. Students can search for classes and register by visiting Student Planning from myaccess.cod.edu.

ENGLI 2210: Prairie Light Review

An experiential course that applies editorial and publication techniques to produce college district literary journal. Includes acquisitions, copy editing, and marketing aspects of publishing. This course may be taken four times for credit. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours) Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Thursday, 12:30 to 3:20 p.m. | Professor Adam Fotos

ENGLI 2250: Introduction to Creative Writing

Students discover and develop their writing talent in several genres, including fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and dramatic writing. Emphasis is on the workshop model in which students provide and receive input on works written for class. This course emphasizes the craft of writing with attention to brainstorming, drafting, and revising as important stages of the writing process. Through analysis of published works, and the production of their own original works, students learn to use language creatively to achieve desired effects. They further consider how intention and audience guide creative choices. Students will explore how creative writing allows for the expression of many multicultural perspectives and how creative works help writers and readers to learn about themselves and the world around them. (3 lecture hours)

  • Tuesday, Thursday, 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Professor Tony Bowers
  • Online (16 week) | Professor Jason Snart

ENGLI 2251: Fiction Writing

Students discover and develop their fiction writing talent. Emphasis is on the workshop model in which students provide and receive input on fiction written for class. This course emphasizes the craft of fiction writing with attention to brainstorming, drafting, and revising as important stages of the writing process. Through analysis of published works of fiction, and the production of their own original works of fiction, students learn to use language creatively to achieve desired effects. They further consider how intention and audience guide creative choices. Students will explore how fiction writing allows for the expression of many multicultural perspectives and how creative works help writers and readers to learn about themselves and the world around them. (3 lecture hours)

  • Monday, Wednesday, 1 to 2:15 p.m. | Professor Tony Bowers
  • Online (12 week) | Professor Trina Sotirakopulos

ENGLI 2252: Poetry Writing

Students discover and develop their talent as poets, working in a variety of poetic forms and styles. Emphasis is on the workshop model in which students provide and receive input on poems written for class. This course emphasizes the craft of writing with attention to brainstorming, drafting, and revising as important stages of the writing process. Through analysis of published poems, and the production of their own original poetry, students learn to use language creatively to achieve desired effects. They further consider how intention and audience guide creative choices. Students will explore how poetry allows for the expression of many multicultural perspectives and how poetry helps writers and readers to learn about themselves and the world around them. (3 lecture hours)

  • Tuesday, Thursday, 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. | Professor Jason Snart

ENGLI 2261: Writing for Publication

This course teaches students how to analyze publishing markets and how to understand important aspects of publication, including query letters, agents, manuscript preparation, and marketing/promotion. As part of learning about how to publish creative work, students also hone their craft as creative writers, learning to use language creatively to achieve desired effects while considering how intention and audience guide creative choices. Students produce original work that is intended for particular publishing outlets. In developing original work for publication, students learn how creative writing allows for the expression of many multicultural perspectives and how creative works help writers and readers to learn about themselves and the world around them. (3 lecture hours) Prerequisite: ENGLI 2210, ENGLI 2250, ENGLI 2251, ENGLI 2252, or ENGLI 2253 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score Category 1.

  • Online (16 week) | Professor Trina Sotirakopulos

ENGLI 1135 (IAI F2 908): Introduction to Film Art

Introduces the basic elements of film as an art form, including cinematography, mise-en-scene, movement, editing, and sound. Social and media contexts of film will also be considered. Through screening, discussion, and critical evaluation of selected films, students develop an ability to interpret cinema through close examination of the relationship between its form and content. Credit cannot be earned for both ENGLI 1135 and MPTV 1135. Pre-Enrollment Criteria: Reading Placement Category 1. (3 lecture hours)

  • Monday, 9 to 11:50 a.m. | Professor Brian Brems
  • Tuesday, 1 to 3:50 p.m. | Professor Dylan Simons
  • Thursday 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Professor Jessica Huth
  • Online (1st 8 week) | Professor Brian Brems
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Sandy Fries
  • Wednesday, 1 to 3:50p.m. (VCM) | Professor Sandy Fries

ENGLI 1145 (IAI F2 909): Film History

Explores the history of film through articulating the evolution of cinema from its inception to the modern era, with emphasis placed on social, historical, and economic contexts that shape changes in film. Through examining a variety of american and international films representing many eras, genres, and filmmakers, students will gain insight into the historical narratives that have shaped film as a mass medium. Credit cannot be earned for both ENGLI 1145 and MPTV 1145. Pre-Enrollment Criteria: Reading Placement Category 1. (3 lecture hours)

  • Wednesday 9 to 11:50 a.m. | Professor Brian Brems
  • Tuesday, 6 to 8:50 p.m. | Professor J. Haden
  • Monday, 1 to 2:15 p.m. | Professor J. Haden
  • Online (1st 8 week) | Professor Brian Brems
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Brian Brems

ENGLI 1154 (IAI HF 908): Film As Literature

Explores the process of film adaptation from a variety of sources. Includes examination of films adapted directly and indirectly from prior media, as well as an overview of theoretical approaches to studying film adaptation. Through close study of selected films, students will develop a nuanced, open approach to considering the process of adaptation on screen. Credit cannot be earned for both ENGLI 1154 and MPTV 1154. Pre-Enrollment Criteria: Reading Placement Category 1. (3 lecture hours)

  • Friday, 9 to 11:50 a.m. | Professor Jacinta Yanders
  • Tuesday, 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Professor Jessica Huth
  • Thursday, 1 to 2:15 p.m. | Professor Jessica Huth
  • Online (1st 8 week) | Professor Michelle Moore
  • Online (16 week) | Professor Michelle Moore

ENGLI 1820: Identity and Film

Provides an introductory exploration into the multifaceted relationship(s) between films and various elements of identity, such as race, socioeconomic status, gender, sexuality, disability, and nationality. In addition to conducting textual analysis of films, course work will include examination of film history, film production, audience reception, and critical response as a means to critically probe how films shape and are shaped by identity and culture.

  • Thursday, 1 to 3:50 p.m. | Professor Jacinta Yanders

ENGLI 2234: Film Directors and Authorship

Focuses on the study of film through examination of the film director and authorship. Studies of one or more directors, authorship theory, and critical dialogue about the concept of authorship and responses to the work of directors will all be covered. Director-focused content will be chosen by the instructor. Credit cannot be earned for both ENGLI 2234 and MPTV 2234. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: ENGLI 1135 with a grade of C or better, or ENGLI 1145 with a grade of C or better, or ENGLI 1154 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor.

  • Monday, 1 to 3:50 p.m. | Professor Brian Brems

ENGLI 1130 (IAI H3 900): Introduction to Literature

Introduces students to the artistic complexity, depth, and nuance of literature and develops the important skills of critical thinking and effective communication. Students analyze literary works from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine literature with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works at the time of publication and beyond. Students explore how literature can reflect, but also challenge, cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Monday, Wednesday, Friday, noon to 12:50 p.m. | Professor Tom Tipton
  • Monday, 6 to 8:50 p.m. | Professor Jackie McGrath
  • Honors Online | Professor Jason Snart
  • Online | Professor Tony Bowers
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Melina Martin

ENGLI 1150 (IAI H3 901): Short Fiction

Introduces students to short fiction's artistic complexity, unique formal elements, depth, and nuance and develops the important skills of critical thinking and effective communication. Students study short fiction from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine short fiction with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works at the time of publication and beyond. Students explore how individual works of short fiction can reflect, but also challenge, cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Monday, Wednesday, 9 to 9:50 a.m. | Professor Tim Henningsen
  • Online (1st 8 week) | Professor Michelle Moore
  • Online (16 week) | Professor Jackie McGrath
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Jackie McGrath

ENGLI 1152 (IAI H3 903): Poetry

Introduces students to the artistic complexity, unique formal elements, depth, and nuance of poetry and develops the important skills of critical thinking and effective communication. Students analyze poetry from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice analysis and argumentation. Students examine poetry with reference to how publication and reception influence poetic works at the time of publication and beyond. Students explore how poetry can reflect but also challenge cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Online (12 week) | Professor Ashley Ott

ENGLI 1156: Science Fiction

Introduces students to the artistic complexity, depth, and nuance of science fiction and develops the important skills of critical thinking and effective communication. Students study science fiction from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine science fiction with reference to how publication and reception influence works at the time of publication and beyond. Students explore how science fiction can reflect, but also challenge, cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Tuesday, Thursday, 11 to 12:15 p.m. | Professor Jim Allen

ENGLI 1157 (IAI H3 918): Children's Literature

Introduces students to the artistic qualities of literature for children and adolescents to develop students' critical thinking and effective communication skills. Students study children's literature and adolescent literature from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts, in order to build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis of works from many genres of children's literature and adolescent literature and they consider the relationship between literacy and literature. Students examine literature both for children and adolescents with reference to how creation, publication, and reception influence those works at the time of creation and beyond. Students also explore how children's literature and adolescent literature can reflect, but also challenge, social norms, especially how children's literature and adolescent literature reflects and shapes any culture's understanding of children and childhood. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Online  | Professor Latrice Ferguson
  • Online (12 week) | Professor Latrice Ferguson

ENGLI 1159 (IAI H9 901): Greek Mythology

Introduces students to the artistic complexity, unique formal elements, depth, and cultural relevance of Greek mythology as represented in both Classical and contemporary literature. Students develop critical thinking and effective communication skills. Students build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning by considering Greek mythology. Students explore how works of Greek mythology can reflect but also challenge cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours) Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Tuesday, Thursday, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. | Professor Bonnie McLean

ENGLI 1161 (IAI H3 910D): Multicultural Literatures of the U.S.

Focuses on literary texts reflecting the experiences of marginalized communities in the U.S. Students explore literary works from diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts for their artistic complexity, unique formal elements, depth, and nuance. Students develop the important skills of critical thinking and effective communication, and they build cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine multicultural literature with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works at the time of publication and beyond. Students explore how individual works of multicultural literature can reflect, but also challenge, cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Monday, Wednesday, 1 to 2:15 p.m. | Professor Jacinta Yanders

ENGLI 2221 (IAI H3 913): British Literature From 1800 Through The Present

A survey of works illustrating the development of British literature from roughly 1800 to the present. Individual works are analyzed for artistic complexity, depth, and nuance as students refine critical thinking and effective communication skills. Diverse literary works from the British tradition from roughly 1800 to the present will be studied to build students' cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine British literature with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works and for how literary traditions and/or movements are formed and how they change. Students explore how literature from this time period can reflect but also challenge cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Reading Placement Test Score Category 1.

  • Monday, Wednesday, 10 to 10:50 a.m. (12 week) | Professor Jason Snart

ENGLI 2224 (IAI H3 915): american Literature From the Civil War to the Present

A survey of works illustrating the development of american literature from the Civil War to the present. Individual works are analyzed for artistic complexity, depth, and nuance as students refine critical thinking and effective communication skills. Diverse literary works from the post-Civil War american tradition will be studied to build students' cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine american literature with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works and for how literary traditions and/or movements are formed and how they change. Students explore how literature from this time period can reflect but also challenge cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Reading Placement Test Score Category 1.

  • Tuesday, Thursday, 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. | Professor Michelle Moore 

ENGLI 2226 (IAI H3 907): World Literature

A survey of world literature. Individual works are analyzed for artistic complexity, depth, and nuance as students refine critical thinking and effective communication skills. Diverse literary works from various literary traditions will be studied to build students' cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine texts from cultures around the world and different time periods with reference to how publication and reception influence literary works at the time of publication and beyond and for how literary traditions and/or movements are formed and change. Students explore how texts of world literature reflect but also challenge cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Online | Professor Melina Martin 

ENGLI 2228 (IAI H3 905): Shakespeare

Study of the prolific career of Shakespeare and of his various works, including multiple plays and poetry. Individual works are analyzed for artistic complexity, depth, and nuance as students refine critical thinking and effective communication skills. Shakespeare's works are considered in reference to Renaissance life and thought and for how they have endured through time. Study of Shakespearean works and an understanding of the nature of dramatic art builds students' cultural awareness and capacity for ethical and socially responsible reasoning. Through close reading, students also practice literary analysis and argumentation. Students examine Shakespeare with reference to how publication, performance, and reception influence literary works and for how literary traditions and/or movements are formed and how they change over time. Students explore how works by Shakespeare can create, reflect, and challenge cultural, social, and literary norms. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Tuesday, Thursday, 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Professor Tom Tipton 

ENGLI 1105: Workplace Writing

Course focuses on the processes and strategies for creating various modes of communication within a workplace setting. Students will gain skills in assessing and addressing various audiences, observing stylistic conventions, and using appropriate elements of document design to communicate effectively. The course emphasizes the preparation of a variety of documents, such as resumes, letters of application, internal and external correspondence, descriptions, proposals, summaries, and reports. It also introduces strategies for conducting research and observing copyright.

Prerequisite: ENGLI 0492 Approaches to College Writing II with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or Prerequisite: ELS 0553 Academic ESL Writing III with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or Appropriate score on the Writing Placement Test(s). Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Tuesday, 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Professor Elizabeth Cicchetti
  • Thursday, 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Professor Elizabeth Cicchetti
  • Online (1st 8 week) | Professor Steve Accardi
  • Online | Professor Nick Sanders
  • Online | Professor Kerri Martin
  • Online (12 week) | Professor Jill Grauman
  • Online (12 week) | Professor Annie Schnarr
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Steve Accardi
  • Online (2nd 8 week) | Professor Muhamed Saadiq

ENGLI 1110: Technical Writing

An introduction to technical writing with an overview of key issues such as usability, audience analysis, designing pages and digital screens, effective collaboration with peers, researching, interpreting and ethically presenting data, and writing clearly and persuasively. Also includes instruction in writing, revising, and presenting common technical writing genres, which could include emails, instructions, tutorials, manuals, reports, product/process descriptions, proposals, and presentations using visual aids.

Prerequisite: ENGLI 0492 Approaches to College Writing II with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or ELS 0553 Academic ESL Writing III with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent or appropriate score on the Writing Placement Test(s). Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Online (12 week) | Professor Jill Grauman

ENGLI 1115: Digital Writing

Students will be introduced to writing in digital environments. They will examine principles and practices, as well as pertinent digital writing issues, including but not limited to: accessibility, ownership, and ethics regarding the digital world. Through hands-on experience with digital tools used in academic and industry settings, students will learn and then apply rhetorical theory to write in diverse digital rhetorical situations. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: ENGLI 0492 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or ELS 0553 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or appropriate score on the Writing Placement Test(s). Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  • Online (12 week) | Professor Kim Groves 

ENGLI 1125: Linguistics

The first course in the scientific study of language. Includes a systematic analysis of word formation, syntax and semantics in the English language and a study of the often universal ways that humans make meaning through language. Also includes study of related issues of language variation, particularly historical development and child language acquisition. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One.

  •  Monday, Wednesday, 1 to 2:15 p.m. | Professor Jim Okrasinski 

ENGLI  2110: Editing in the Professions

Equips students with basic editing skills that will help in future editing experiences, such as advanced classes, their own writing and editing projects, internships, and employment. Introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of editors, including how they interact with others during production and use strategies for efficient editing processes. Develops understanding of basic copyediting skills, including editing for clarity, accuracy, consistency, completeness, and appropriateness for the intended audience. Emphasizes flexibility in applying style and usage requirements, depending on the rhetorical situation. Develops ability to use and apply style guides, style sheets, and copyediting symbols, and technologies central to modern publishing. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: ENGLI 1102 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in ENGLI 1102, or ENGLI 1105 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in ENGLI 1105, or ENGLI 1110 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in ENGLI 1110, or ENGLI 1115 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in ENGLI 1115, or consent of instructor.

  • Online | Professor Jill Grauman

ENGLI 2115
Writing for Nonprofits

An in-depth study of the content, form, and function of the professional writing used in community organizations. Provides a solid foundation for students currently working or planning on working at a community organization. Special attention will be paid to public rhetoric for the purposes of communicating the missions of the community organization, such as attaining grants, fundraising, and establishing goodwill in the community. Includes instruction in rhetoric, research, and writing professional texts, such as grants, reports, proposals, advertisements, research requests, and presentations. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: ENGLI 1102 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in ENGLI 1102 or consent of instructor.

  • Online (12 week) | Professor Steve Accardi 

Honors ENGLI 2300: Advanced Composition

Builds upon the rhetoric and writing skills developed in Composition I and II. Students will study and apply rhetorical theory, from the classical through the postmodern periods, in order to read and write within a variety of rhetorical situations. They will also investigate and incorporate research methodologies and prose styles used in different academic and professional discourse communities. Students will create a portfolio of work tailored to their academic and professional goals, which will include multimodal elements. (3 lecture hours)

Prerequisite: ENGLI 1102 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

  • Tuesday, Thursday, 11 to 12:15 p.m. | Professor Steve Accardi