Black History Month 2021

The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity (2021 National Theme)

Juneteenth Emancipation Day Celebration, June 19, 1900, Texas (Public Domain)

Emancipation Day celebration June 19, 1900 Juneteenth Emancipation Day Celebration, June 19, 1900, Texas (Public Domain)

Emancipation Day celebration June 19, 1900

Emancipation Day is when the government declared that it would be against the law to make Black people and Black Families, including their descendants (the children, grandchildren and great-grand children, etc.) taken from Africa, to continue as enslaved people. In Ontario and many of the islands in the Caribbean, the holiday marks the end of slavery for people who were taken from Africa to places that were part of the British Empire. In the United States, the celebration marks the end of slavery and the end of the Civil War in 1862. This period launched the continued struggle for the equity of Black people in America and sparked the complex evolution and progression of the Black family (CBC, 2021).

View the 2021 Black History Month Photo Gallery

 

The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity

The black family has been a topic of study in many disciplines—history, literature, the visual arts, sociology, religion, anthropology, politics, social justice, and socioeconomic policy. Its representation, identity, and diversity have been reverenced, stereotyped, and vilified from the days of slavery to the present. While some have described the black family as a microcosm of the entire race, its complexity as the "foundation" of African American life and history can be seen in numerous debates.

Throughout American history, challenges have existed with representing the meaning of the black family from a historical and contemporary perspective. The black family's constructs are enslaved or free, patriarchal or matriarchal/matrifocal, single-headed or dual-headed household, extended or nuclear, fictive kin or blood lineage, legal or common law, and black or interracial, etc. The variation appears, as well, in discussions on the nature and impact of parenting, childhood, marriage, gender norms, sexuality, and incarceration. During February 2021, College of DuPage will examine, recognize, and celebrate the black family, which offers a rich tapestry of images for exploring the African American past and present (ASALH, 2021).

 

21 Days of Black History

Each weekday during Black History Month, the COD community has an opportunity to receive a short introduction to an event or figure significant to Black History along with curated resources that help make connections between history and current events. For more information contact kelleyj@cod.edu

 

Black History Month 2021 Expressions Competition

Read more about the Expressions Competition

Students are invited to submit an essay, a story, a piece of art or music, a poem, or any other form of expression that reflects the theme: The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity. Top four (4) submittals will be awarded and their selections will be featured on the Center for Student Diversity, Equity and Inclusion webpage!

 

Black History Month 2021 Event Listing

All events this year are either livestream or virtual. Click the following links to view the weekly schedule.

The Messenger Public Library Guest Speaker: Dr. Robert Moorehead

Monday, Feb. 22

Dr. Robert Moorehead, associate professor of sociology at College of DuPage, will present “Systemic Racism in America: Understanding Our Racial Past and Present.”

Dr. Moorehead is an associate professor of sociology at College of DuPage, where he has taught since 2015. He earned his MA and Ph.D. in sociology from University of California-Davis and was previously an associate professor in the College of International Relations at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan. Prof. Moorehead’s teaching and research focus on issues of race, ethnicity, and immigration in the United States and Japan, including the incorporation of Japanese Peruvian immigrants into Japanese society.

 

Connect, Engage and Uplift: Have Some Fun and Be Encouraged

Thursday Feb. 25

Relaxed, Fun, Hang out Sessions for Information, Relationships, Real Talk and Encouragement! Join in with stories, poems, spoken word, songs, and rap, whatever you choose to inspire us to keep going and stay the course!

 

The Annual African-American Read-in

Thursday, Feb. 25

Read more information on the Annual African-American Read-in

The National African American Read-In is the nation’s first and oldest event dedicated to diversity in literature. A national literacy initiative of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the event is sponsored by the College of DuPage Library. The COD event will feature student, faculty and staff volunteer readers presenting their favorite selections from African American books, essays, music and poetry collections, as well as brief biological sketches of the authors.

 

A Taste of History

Friday, Feb, 26

Share an interactive “at home” experience and learn how the black family has impacted culinary diversity in America. Explore healthy options and disaggregate the story behind some familiar dishes in a video with professional chefs! Read more about recipes

"New Letters on the Air"

WDCB (90.9FM and WDCB.org) will devote the "WDCB Weekly" program (Sundays 7:30 a.m. - 8 a.m.) in the month of February to special archival installments of an interview series called "New Letters On the Air." Featuring interviews with notable Black American writers.

February 28, 2021: Ernest Gaines

In addition, WDCB will also spotlight the work of great Black jazz artists past & present throughout our flagship 'DCB Jazz programming during the month of February.

 

Athletes in Protest 2020: A Panel Discussion

Monday March 1

Join a discussion facilitated by the College of DuPage’s faculty regarding the history of the athletes against racial injustices in America. Sparked by Colin Kaepernick’s “taking a knee” to the recent professional athletes and others who have demonstrated against racism. This panel will bring awareness to the questions: how does the action of the today's professional athletes impact a movement? Is anything different now than back in 2016? How do these actions impact the black family?

 

The MAC Presents: The Life of Katherine Dunham

Tuesday, March 2

Join special guests who will discuss the life and works of Katherine Dunham, an African-American dancer, choreographer, creator of the Dunham Technique, author, educator, anthropologist, and social activist.

Black History Month 2021 Opening Celebration

Featuring students and a spoken word artist

Monday, Feb. 1

Via Facebook Live

College of DuPage opens with an engaging Facebook live presentation for our teaching and learning experience. We will hear from President, Dr. Brian Caputo, select student speakers, and a special guest spoken word artist! COD students who log in to the ceremony and provide their COD email on February 1, 2020 will qualify for three special prizes (each)!

 

Student Life Trivia Night

Thursday, Feb. 4

Are you a trivia pro? Let's find out! Join Student Life for our monthly trivia night! Gather your friends "virtually" and see who can make it to the top of the leaderboard! Watch the recorded event.

 

College of DuPage WDCB 90.9FM Radio Presents

"New Letters on the Air"

WDCB (90.9FM and WDCB.org) will devote the "WDCB Weekly" program (Sundays 7:30 a.m. - 8 a.m.) in the month of February to special archival installments of an interview series called "New Letters On the Air." Featuring interviews with notable Black American writers.

February 7, 2021: August Wilson

In addition, WDCB will also spotlight the work of great Black jazz artists past & present throughout our flagship 'DCB Jazz programming during the month of February.

Global Flicks

Daughters of the Dust Live Discussion

Wednesday, Feb. 10

"Daughters of the Dust" is a 1991 independent film written, directed and produced by Julie Dash and is the first feature film directed by an African-American woman distributed theatrically in the United States. Set in 1902, it tells the story of three generations of Gullah (also known as Geechee) women living on Saint Helena Island as they prepare to migrate off the island, out of the Southern United States, and into the North. The film is available through COD Library on Canopy for students/employees.

Ways To watch the film

  • Available to rent – YouTube ($2.99), Amazon Prime ($1.99), iTunes: ($3.99)
  • Available on Kanopy: COD students & faculty can watch for free with COD Library card
  • Local Library: Glen Ellyn and Wheaton

 

Connect, Engage and Uplift: Have Some Fun and Be Encouraged

Thursday, Feb. 11

Relaxed, Fun, Hang out Sessions for Information, Relationships, Real Talk and Encouragement! Join in with stories, poems, spoken word, songs, and rap, whatever you choose to inspire us to keep going and stay the course!

 

Music Fridays

Friday, Feb. 12

The COD music faculty created Music Fridays @ Noon to showcase student, faculty, alumni and guest artists in a free, accessible daytime series of music performances and related events. The series is open to the entire COD community as a place where a broad spectrum of music is on display. Concerts are approximately one hour in length.

Chamber Singers Celebrate Black History Month

Chamber Singers under the direction of Lee R. Kesselman is a choral ensemble that specializes in vocal chamber music of all periods. This performance features selections that celebrate Black History Month.

 

"New Letters on the Air"

WDCB (90.9FM and WDCB.org) will devote the "WDCB Weekly" program (Sundays 7:30 a.m. - 8 a.m.) in the month of February to special archival installments of an interview series called "New Letters On the Air." Featuring interviews with notable Black American writers.

February 14, 2021: Gwendolyn Brooks

In addition, WDCB will also spotlight the work of great Black jazz artists past & present throughout our flagship 'DCB Jazz programming during the month of February.

Lisle Library District Virtual Program

The Black Panthers

Guest Speaker: Dr. Theodore Darden, College of DuPage Justice Studies Professor

Tuesday, Feb. 16

What was the Black Panther Party, and how did their tactics differ from those of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.?  Join Dr. Theodore Darden, professor of Justice Studies at College of DuPage to discuss the history of the Black Panthers. Dr. Darden will delve into the community activism of the Party, the assassination of its pivotal members, and how it relates to today's Black Lives Matter movement. 

This virtual program requires the use of a computer or device and an internet connection. 

Registered participants will receive Zoom information as the date approaches. 

 

Guest Speaker: Veronica Williams-Hall

College of DuPage Alum

Wednesday, Feb. 17

Veronica Williams-Hall is a recent alum of College of DuPage. A former Black Student Alliance President and member of the COD Forensics Team. As a young adult, Veronica will speak on the impact of the Black Family in America and share an interactive experience on black culture, social awareness and the plight of success for a young generation of leaders.

 

Student Life : Ask Big Questions

Thursday, Feb. 18

Ask Big Questions Conversation Circle: “Who is in your family?”

Join us for a guided conversation to explore “Who is in your family?” For some people, family is everything: the deepest and firmest bond there is. For others family is something to escape, a source of pain and frustration. For some, “family” prompts the mainstream picture of mom-dad-kids. For others, their family structure seems always to be described with modifiers: blended, extended, chosen, single-parent, foster, multi-racial. Regardless of what it looks like, and even whether it is close or strained, the concept and importance of The Family looms large in our individual and communal lives - our conversation guide asks "who belongs to us and to whom do we belong.”

 

"New Letters on the Air"

WDCB (90.9FM and WDCB.org) will devote the "WDCB Weekly" program (Sundays 7:30 a.m. - 8 a.m.) in the month of February to special archival installments of an interview series called "New Letters On the Air." Featuring interviews with notable Black American writers.

February 21, 2021: Isabel Wilkerson

In addition, WDCB will also spotlight the work of great Black jazz artists past & present throughout our flagship 'DCB Jazz programming during the month of February.

Archive

 

Contact Information

Center for Student Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (CSDEI)
Student Services Center (SSC), Room 2225E

David A. Swope Sr.
Manager, Student Diversity Equity and Inclusion
(630) 942-2565 
Office Hours: Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Follow us:

InstagramInstagram: @codstudentdei