Course Search Results

HomeCatalogSearch Catalog
  • Japanese (JAPAN)   1100
    Japanese Civilization and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Introduction in English to the culture, history, political institutions, mentality, literature/art and economic position of present-day Japan. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One. (3 lecture hours)

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   1101
    Elementary Japanese I

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to modern Japanese: pronunciation, useful expressions, speech patterns, listening, reading and writing. (4 lecture hours)

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   1102
    Elementary Japanese II

    4 credit hours

    Continuation of JAPAN-1101 with emphasis on increased accuracy in listening, speaking skills, reading and writing. For students who have successfully completed Japanese 1101 or equivalent or three years of high school Japanese. (4 lecture hours)

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   1800
    Special Project

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the catalogue for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30% but not to exceed 70% (to be determined by the disciplines). This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles, and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.). This course may be taken four times for credit.

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course descriptions, goals, objectives, topical outline, and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required. (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   2201
    Intermediate Japanese I

    4 credit hours

    Continuation of JAPAN-1102 with emphasis on listening, speaking and writing of kana and kanji as well as reading of authentic materials. For students who have successfully completed Japanese 1102 or equivalent or 4 years of high school Japanese. (4 lecture hours)

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   2202 (IAI H1 900)
    Intermediate Japanese II

    4 credit hours

    Continuation of JAPAN-2201 with emphasis on listening, speaking and writing of kana and kanji as well as reading of authentic materials. For students who have successfully completed Japanese 2201 or equivalent or five years of high school Japanese. (4 lecture hours)

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   2251
    Conversation and Composition I

    3 credit hours

    Develops students' listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills and expands knowledge of the culture and civilization of Japanese-speaking countries. For students who have successfully completed Japanese 2202 or equivalent. (3 lecture hours)

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   2252
    Conversation and Composition II

    3 credit hours

    Continue to develop students' listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills and expands knowledge of the culture and civilization of Japanese-speaking countries. For students who have successfully completed Japanese 2251. (3 lecture hours)

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   2800
    Special Project

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the discipline, while building upon academic knowledge and skills acquired in introductory-level classes. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30% but not to exceed 70%. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of more complex geographic concepts, theories, principles, and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.). This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor.

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Japanese (JAPAN)   2871
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1100 (IAI CRJ 901)
    Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 credit hours

    Students will study the development and principles of the American criminal justice system. An emphasis will be placed on the system's primary components of courts, police, and corrections and the relationship of these entities in the administration of criminal justice in the United States. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1110
    Police and Society

    3 credit hours

    Students will examine the role of police in a modern society including the functions, personnel systems, operations, management, and contemporary issues of municipal, county, state, and federal law enforcement. In addition, the historical and emerging roles of law enforcement as agents of formal social control will be discussed in addition to police and community relations. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1112
    Crime Prevention

    3 credit hours

    An overview of crime prevention strategies from an individual and community perspective, including a discussion and analysis of neighborhood watch programs, home security strategies and personal security tactics. School based and age-specific community crime prevention programs and the application of technology to crime prevention problems are discussed. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1130 (IAI CRJ 911)
    Introduction to Corrections

    3 credit hours

    An overview of the goals, structure and operations of correctional institutions; sentencing trends and alternatives to incarceration; probation and parole; inmate life, prisonization and institutionalization; jail administration and community correctional programs. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1135
    Gangs in Society

    3 credit hours

    Students will be provided an overview of the historic evolution of gangs in American society. An emphasis will be placed on theoretical explanations of why gangs exist and youth involvement in addition to society's and the criminal justice system's response to gang activities. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1140
    Principles of Security Administration

    3 credit hours

    An overview of security systems found in industrial, commercial, retail and governmental agencies; legal framework for security programs; internal business crime and its detection, apprehension and prevention. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1142
    Private Security and Law Enforcement

    3 credit hours

    Theories and practices pertaining to the relationship between private security and public law enforcement. Exploration of how these professions share many of the same goals, such as preventing crime and disorder, identifying criminals, and ensuring the security of people and property. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1145
    Introduction to Homeland Security

    3 credit hours

    An overview of the evolution of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in the U.S. and an analysis of the major policies, practices, concepts, and challenges confronting the field. Modern threats from domestic, international, and transnational terrorism will be addressed along with issues stemming from other forms of geopolitical conflict and natural disasters. The roles of various agencies under the authority of the DHS as well as other government entities, private organizations, and individual citizens in responding to the modern threat landscape will be examined. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1146
    Critical Infrastructure: Vulnerabilities Solutions

    3 credit hours

    A comprehensive examination of the vulnerabilities and protections surrounding America's critical infrastructure. Topics including U.S. borders, transportation sectors, finance, agriculture, and cyber platforms will be analyzed. Modes of protection through government agencies, physical security measures, and critical infrastructure policy will be addressed in the context of real and potential attacks by nefarious actors. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1147
    Introduction to Domestic, International, and Transnational Terrorism

    3 credit hours

    Examination of the threats posed by domestic, international, and transnational terrorism and the complex origins, motivations, ideologies, and goals of various terrorist groups. Cultural, religious, and economic influences on terrorism will be analyzed. Topical issues will include state, political, and revolutionary terrorism, religious and apocalyptic violence, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorist tactics and targeting. International and domestic counterterrorism policies will also be considered. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1148
    Emergency Management I

    3 credit hours

    Examines theories, principles, and practices of emergency management, including the related processes of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Evolution of emergency management and its practical application within government and the private sector will be addressed. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1151
    Constitutional Law

    3 credit hours

    Students explore the development and history of the Federal Constitution emphasizing the Bill of Rights. Students will be introduced to the substantive and procedural content of the federal amendments and corresponding state provisions with emphasis on recent court interpretations and trends. Prerequisite: Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1100 or equivalent or Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1152 or equivalent or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1152
    Criminal Law

    3 credit hours

    Students will be introduced to the development of criminal law, its organizational components and processes, as well as its legal and public policy. Students will explore instruction on elements of a crime, substantive criminal law, criminal defenses, and accountability within the judicial process. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1153
    Courts, Evidence, and Mock Trial

    3 credit hours

    This course will examine how the American court system operates, analyze how the courts enforce the Federal rules governing the admissibility of evidence, and apply the rules of evidence in a mock court trial. Prerequisite: Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1151 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1151 or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1154
    Substance Abuse and the Law

    3 credit hours

    Students will examine the most prevalent illicit and licit drugs through a historical, pharmacological, physiological assessment in order to understand their impact on the individual, their health, and society. Also reviewed are aspects of drug enforcement, adjudication, sentencing and treatment aspects as they relate to crimes involving substance abuse. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1165
    Computers and Criminal Justice

    3 credit hours

    A comprehensive overview of computer-related crimes, including related reactive and proactive investigative strategies; programs involving computer technologies developed and utilized by criminal justice investigators, analysts and other professionals. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1210
    Criminal Justice in the Media

    3 credit hours

    An examination of the intersection between criminality and justice and how public perception about criminal justice is influenced by mass media. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1510
    Introduction to Global Justice

    3 credit hours

    Students will engage in study and research with regard to the criminal justice system in the United States and other countries. Students will visit jails, prisons, juvenile facilities, police agencies, and courts to go behind the scenes to learn how these agencies operate. Students will get to interview professionals and hear their perspectives about the field of criminal justice. In the second phase of the course, students will travel abroad for a comparative analysis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1520
    Introduction to Death Investigations and Taphonomy

    3 credit hours

    Students will explore criminal investigations with an emphasis on death investigation. Students will also be introduced to the field of taphonomy as it relates to death investigations, forensic anthropology, and osteology. Course participants will be provided with an overview of identifying human remains, human decomposition, postmortem interval estimation, and human remains recovery. Students will travel to Knoxville, Tennessee for a field component. Prerequisite: Concurrent Enrollment in Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 2520 and consent of instructor. All students must be interviewed by the instructor and be clear of any felony convictions. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1820
    Selected Topics

    3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college class schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required. (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2030
    Probation and Parole

    3 credit hours

    Study the history, development, organization, and operation of probation and parole and other community corrections methods as a strategy to address criminal offenders. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2130
    Emergency Management II

    3 credit hours

    Exploration of concepts, theories, programs, and requirements of emergency preparedness, governmental planning, training, exercises, hazard and risk assessment, and team building. Students will study the relationship of preparedness to response, inter-jurisdictional emergency operations, and incident command systems. Prerequisite: Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1148 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2140
    Introduction to Intelligence

    3 credit hours

    Overview of the history of the intelligence industry in the United States from its founding to the present day. Concepts, processes, tradecraft, and ethical considerations associated with U.S. intelligence operations will be explored. The specific disciplines of collection, processing, analysis, and dissemination will be examined in the context of past and current geopolitical threats, international terrorism, and wider homeland security policy. Prerequisite: Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1145 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1145, or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2141
    Intelligence Analysis

    3 credit hours

    In-depth exploration and application of structured analytic techniques within the context of current domestic and international geopolitical threats. The specific disciplines of both descriptive and predictive analysis will be examined while identifying areas of personal, professional, and institutional biases which influence analytical products. Particular attention will be paid to diagnostic, contrarian, and imaginative thinking exercises as used by professional intelligence entities. Prerequisite: Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 2140 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 2140 or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2150
    Multiculturalism and Diversity

    3 credit hours

    Students will examine current issues and social problems relating to the administration of justice in a culturally diverse society. Emphasis will be placed on the development of new strategies for criminal justice personnel to meet the challenges presented by working within a diverse society. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2160
    Weapons of Mass Destruction

    3 credit hours

    An examination of major chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) weapons of mass destruction (WMD), their precursors, delivery systems, and international proliferation trends. Identifying warning signs and symptoms of exposure will be analyzed, as well as public and private sector assets and protocols available to mitigate mass destruction events. Prerequisite: Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1145 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1145, or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2230
    Criminal Investigations

    3 credit hours

    Students will study the fundamentals of criminal investigations. The collection and preservation of evidence along with recording of crime scenes will be emphasized. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2231
    Criminology

    3 credit hours

    Students are introduced to theoretical explanations of crime, criminality, and society's response to antisocial and law violating behavior. Theories of crime causation are used to understand crime patterns, evaluate trends, and understand how social scientific inquiry impact research, theory, and public policy. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2240 (IAI CRJ 914)
    Juvenile Delinquency

    3 credit hours

    Students will examine the historic context of juvenile delinquency in America. Theoretical perspectives of the causation of delinquency and criminal acts by juveniles will be studied and discussed. The overall treatment of juveniles as offenders and victims will be examined in addition to theoretical perspectives and prevention programs. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2250
    Police Organization and Administration

    3 credit hours

    Analysis of classical and current law enforcement organizational patterns, including an overview of the administrative processes within police agencies and management theories as applied to law enforcement administration. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2310
    Introduction to Forensic Crime Scene Investigation

    3 credit hours

    Students will study techniques of forensic science as it relates to crime scene investigations. The procedures and practices of proper identification, collection, recording, preservation, and processing of evidence at crime scenes will be discussed. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2410
    Violent Crime

    3 credit hours

    Overview of theories to explain violence, methods used in the scientific study of violence, and important research findings about correlates, patterns, processes, and trends related to criminal violence. Exploration of case studies related to violence. Prerequisite: Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1100 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2510
    Global Justice Field Study

    3 credit hours

    Students will compare and contrast British and American criminal justice systems. Participants will have an opportunity to explore British police, courts, and correctional facilities on a 12-14 day visit to the United Kingdom. In addition, students will experience British culture from a contemporary and historical perspective. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and concurrent enrollment in Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1510. All students must be interviewed by the instructor and be clear of any criminal convictions. Students must also have or be able to obtain a valid passport. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2520
    Death Investigations/Taphonomy Field Study

    3 credit hours

    Students will travel to Knoxville, Tennessee for five days and participate in a field study regarding taphonomy, oseteology, and forensic anthropology as they relate to the human death process. The course will be offered through the Forensic Anthropology Department at the University of Tennessee. Students will participate in classroom exercises, field work at the Anthropological Research Facility, and present their research and course work formally to class peers and University staff. Prerequisite: Anthropology 2400 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent and concurrent enrollment in Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1520, and consent of instructor. All students must be interviewed by the instructor and be clear of any felony convictions. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2820
    Selected Topics

    3 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college class schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Justice Studies (CRIMJ) 1100 or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Justice Studies (CRIMJ)   2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.