Juárez Action & Information Network at College of DuPage

Prof. Yearman's Website | Latin American Studies Committee |
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¡Ni una mas!

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"The Laboratory of Our Future"

Since the early 1990s, young women have repeatedly been kidnapped, raped, tortured, and mutilated, their nude bodies thrown in the deserts surrounding Ciudad Juárez. The death toll stands at 400, with another 4,500 reported missing. The murders continue today, with the recent murders of Cynthia Irasema Ramos and Flor Fabiola Ferrer Rivera.

Juárez is a city which must provide services to the factories, the maquiladoras, under the free trade agreement and other neoliberal policies - before it can consider providing services to the people. The shantytowns throughout the metropolitan area lack water, electricity, addresses, and other fundamental services. Despite the violence, and deplorable conditions of the shantytowns and within the maquiladoras, 50,000 people move to Juárez yearly.

The U.S. State Department adds to the problem by using Juárez as its primary facility for visa applications (even though these are short-term visits, why would you send more people to this city knowing the violence and other problems).

The victims' families struggle daily. They protest repeatedly, and will tell their stories (of botched investigations, of police harassment, of government corruption) to anyone who will listen. The Mexican, state and local governments have done literally nothing to solve the crimes, nor to prevent further murders. Indeed, most of the murders remain unsolved.

These pages have been created to help disseminate information regarding the femicides in Ciudad Juárez and Chihuahua City (which is undergoing a similar crisis, though smaller in number). These pages also provide background on the economic conditions which have helped create the situation in Juárez (this is by no means an exhaustive source on the city nor the social, economic, political, etc. conditions which have festered into this terrible situation).

These pages have been created by Keith Yearman, Assistant Professor of Geography at College of DuPage. You'll notice certain pages for students in his courses. Otherwise, the material on this site is for everyone's use and disemmination.

This page is dedicated to Esther Chavez Cano, a friend who has dedicated her life to helping victims of domestic abuse in Juárez and to drawing attention to the femicides. You can read more about Esther's work throughout this site.

 

Esther Chavez Cano
Photograph by Greg Bloom

 

 

 

Geography Program at College of DuPage| ©2003 Keith Yearman