Anthropology

  • Anthropology 1000 (IAI S1 900N)
    Introduction to Anthropology

    3  credit hours

    Introduces students to the four primary sub-fields of anthropology as well as the applications of anthropological work in addressing domestic, international, and cross-cultural issues and dilemmas. Emphasis is placed on the complementary and interrelated nature of archaeology, cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1100 (IAI S1 901N)
    Cultural Anthropology

    3  credit hours

    Introduces cultural anthropology as a subfield of anthropology that studies contemporary societies. Focuses on patterns in human behavior and on culture as the way people live and adapt to their various situations. Emphasis is on the diversity of cultural patterns throughout the world and the essential humanity of all people. Examples from a wide variety of cultures are presented in a variety of formats. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1105 (IAI S1 904D)
    Practical Anthropology

    3  credit hours

    Concentrates on how concepts, techniques and information from anthropology can be applied to helping people solve their problems and improve their lives. Emphasizes the relevance of anthropology to development issues and to concerns of many career fields such as business, medicine, social work, teaching and management. Course examples are drawn from diverse parts of the world. Individual project(s) relate to students' interests and/or careers.(3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1110 
    Business Anthropology

    3  credit hours

    Holistic approach to economic systems examining how family, language, religion, class, education and gender roles inform economic practices. Emphasis on the diversity of cultural patterns throughout the world and the essential humanity of all people. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1130 (IAI S1 904D)
    People and Cultures of the World

    3  credit hours

    An introductory exploration of specific populations and cultures in different areas of the world today, focusing on interaction between a society's culture and its environmental, demographic, and historical conditions. Emphasis on the areas of subsistence, religion, and/or urbanization/complexity. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1200 (IAI S1 903)
    Discovering Archaeology

    3  credit hours

    Introduces archaeology as a subfield of anthropology that studies humanity's prehistory, history and present through the study of material remains and the archaeological record of human development. Emphasis is placed on what archaeologists do and the science of archaeology. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 1210 
    Ancient Civilizations and Societies

    3  credit hours

    Explores the emergence of human societies and civilizations through archaeology. This course covers major landmarks in the development of human civilizations including the emergence of humankind, the development of agriculture, urbanism, and the high civilizations of antiquity. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1300 
    Language and Culture

    3  credit hours

    Introduces Linguistic Anthropology as a subfield of Anthropology that explores how humans communicate. Focuses on language as the basis for social relations and culture. Emphasis is on the similarities and differences of human languages, the cognitive basis for language, the formation of communication systems, and the adaptive use of those systems in human societies. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1400 (IAI S1 902)
    Race, Sex and Human Evolution

    3  credit hours

    Introduces the field of physical anthropology, sometimes known as biological anthropology. Topics include the scientific foundations for studying race and human variation as well as popular misconceptions about human genetic diversity; primatology, including a survey of living primate forms; evolutionary theory, the fossil record and the development of humans; and humanity's place in world ecology. Introduces forensic anthropology. Includes laboratory work centered on these topics and skeletal biology. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 1410 
    Evolution of Human Sexual Behavior

    3  credit hours

    Introduces human sex and sexuality from an evolutionary perspective. Explores how evolution has shaped the bodies, behaviors, and nature of modern humans as sexual beings. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1800 
    Special Project

    1 to 3  credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.).

  • Anthropology 1820 
    Selected Topics I

    3  credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1840 
    Independent Study

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 2100 
    Introduction to Anthropological Methods

    4  credit hours

    Introduces anthropological methods with an applied focus to study contemporary societies and addresses contemporary problems. Utilizes ethnography, case studies, cultural mapping interviews, textual analysis, observations, participant observation, ethology, focus groups, and other techniques. Students develop a keen awareness of cultural issues in research. Prerequisite: Anthropology 1000, Anthropology 1100, or Anthropology 1105, with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 2150 
    Culture and the Mind

    3  credit hours

    Introduces an evolutionary approach to the understanding of how human nature was shaped in the Pleistocene Era and continues to have profound influences on contemporary behavior. Focuses on the evolution of traits that serve as the basis for human adaptations imposed by the needs related to subsistence, safety, sex, and sociality. Emphasis is on the role of culture and language as selective pressures in their own right, the evolved mental domains that have served our species, the basis for these adaptations, and the biological platforms for these systems. Anthropology 1101 and Anthropology 1125 are recommended. Prerequisite: Psychology 1100 with a grade of D or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 2200 
    Introduction to Anthropological Methods

    4  credit hours

    Provides an overview of the major methods of field work and research design in anthropology and related social and behavioral sciences. Students will analyze one or more topics using appropriate qualitative and quantitative methodological techniques. Some field work may be required. (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2210 
    Field Experience/Applied Anthropology

    4  credit hours

    Introduces students to experiential-based learning of anthropological methods with an applied focus to study contemporary societies. Provides a framework for implementing the methods designed in the Introduction to Anthropological Methods course. Prerequisite: Anthropology 2100, with a grade of C or better and Business 1100, with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (8 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2240 
    Field Work Archaeology

    3  credit hours

    Introduces the techniques and theory of field archaeology through actual excavation of prehistoric and historic field archaeological sites and work with actual artifacts and other materials from those sites. Check the anthropology lab or semester listings of the timing and location of archaeological field schools. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2245 
    Laboratory Methods in Archaeology

    3  credit hours

    Introduces the techniques and theory of archaeological lab analysis through the examination of materials from various sites in both the United States and other regions of the world. Individual projects may center around particular interests. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2400 
    Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

    3  credit hours

    Introduces students to the identification of the bones of the human skeleton and techniques used to recover and treat forensic material. Topics include use of skeletal remains to identify age at death, biological sex, ancestry and stature; identification of traumatic, pathological and occupational markers on the skeleton; and determination of time since death and post-mortem damage. Includes discussion of ethics involved in forensic anthropology. Prerequisite: Anthropology 1101 or Anthropology 1125 or Criminal Justice 1142 or Criminal Justice 2230, with a grade of C or better or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2800 
    Special Project

    1 to 3  credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor

  • Anthropology 2820 
    Advanced Selected Topics I

    3  credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 2860 
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Anthropology 2870 
    Internship (Transfer)

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Anthropology 2871 
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1 to 4  credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

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