Course Search Results

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1100
    Intro to the Early Childhood Profession

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the field of early childhood education and care including the history of early childhood education and the various types and components of current early childhood programs. Ways that early childhood programs support the development of children and the professional roles and responsibilities of the early childhood educator will be explored. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test-Category One.(2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1101
    Growth & Development of the Young Child

    3 credit hours

    An overview of all aspects of child growth and development from conception through adolescence. Child development theory, principles of sequential growth with emphasis on the significance of family, peers, school and culture. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One. (3 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1102
    Child Guidance Practices

    3 credit hours

    A study of guidance practices that support the development of the young child including the relationship of developmental theories to guidance practices. Lab experiences provide practice in observation, reflection and interaction with young children. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1100 with a grade of C or better or equivalent and Early Childhood Education and Care 1101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1110
    Parenting and the Young Child

    2 credit hours

    A practical analysis of parent-child interaction with emphasis on understanding developmental tasks of the early childhood years. Motivation and guidance as applied to child and parent are explored. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1116
    Care Infant Toddler & Two-Year Child I

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to theories and research related to the development of infant, toddler and two-year-old children. Ways of providing a safe, stimulating and nurturing environment that fosters the optimum growth and development of the individual child are examined. Thirty hours laboratory work of group care of children aged six weeks to 36 months are required. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1117
    Care Infant, Toddler & Two-Year Child II

    3 credit hours

    Continuation of the study of development, education and care of infant, toddler and two-year-old children. The teacher's role in providing an environment that fosters the optimum growth and development of the individual child is examined. Thirty hours of laboratory work in group care of children aged six weeks to 36 months are required. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1101 or Early Childhood Education and Care 1116 (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1120
    Family Child Care Management

    2 credit hours

    This course includes the practical consideration of issues and responsibilities in providing family child care for infants and young children. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1121
    Family Child Care Curriculum & Guidance

    2 credit hours

    Specialized knowledge and skills for family child care providers. Curriculum and guidance skills appropriate for the multi-age groups of children in family child care. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1130
    Methods: Discovery & the Physical World

    3 credit hours

    An overview of experiences and methods for helping children learn about the physical world. Emphasizes the adult's responsibilities in the implementation of nature, science, blocks, mathematics, motor coordination, cooking and the sensory activities. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1100 with a grade of C or better or equivalent and Early Childhood Education and Care 1101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1140
    Methods: Self-Expression & Social World

    3 credit hours

    An overview of a wide variety of experiences and methods for developing children's self-expression and helping them learn about the social world. Emphasizes the adult's responsibilities in the implementation of literacy, dramatic play, art, construction, social studies, music and movement. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1100 with a grade of C or better or equivalent and Early Childhood Education and Care 1101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1151
    Lang & Literacy Development Young Child

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to speech and language development of young children and teaching practices that support language and literacy development. Typical and atypical language development and the factors that influence that development will be emphasized. Planning and implementing developmentally appropriate activities and instructional materials is included. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1100 with a grade of C or better or equivalent and Early Childhood Education and Care 1101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1161
    Multicultural Curriculum for Young Child

    2 credit hours

    Introduction to multicultural curriculum activities, materials and environments for young children. Special emphasis on applying multicultural education principles to curriculum planning. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1162
    Multicultural Perspectives Child Devlpmt

    2 credit hours

    Exploration of multicultural perspectives of child care and development. Emphasis on cultural and family factors that shape and influence the contexts in which young children develop. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1163
    Practicum: At-Risk Early Childhood Prog

    1 credit hours

    Daily participation in an at-risk early childhood program for young children. Students will assist teachers in the program under the supervision of a faculty supervisor. Students apply knowledge and practice skills gained in child care classes. Seventy-five hours of practicum required. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1102, Early Childhood Education and Care 1161 and Early Childhood Education and Care 1162 or consent of instructor (5 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1820
    Selected Topics

    1 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: This course is designed for students nearing completion of the Early Childhood Education and Care program or for child care practitioners. Students should have attained minimum Department of Children and Family Services credit hours for a child care director position before enrolling in the course. (1 lecture hour)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within Early Childhood Education and Care to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2201
    Creative Art Activities for the Young Ch

    2 credit hours

    Introduction to a variety of materials and experiences suitable for creative artistic expression of the young child. The use of various media to provide opportunities for expression and exploration is emphasized. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2203
    Music and Movement for the Young Child

    2 credit hours

    An introduction to music and movement experiences for the young child. The relationship of children's developmental needs to the music and movement curriculum is explored. Students will compile resources of music and movement activities. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2204
    Child Care Environment

    2 credit hours

    This course explores indoor and outdoor environments in child care centers that support the development of young children. Materials and equipment selection and room arrangement are included. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2206
    Science and Nature for the Young Child

    2 credit hours

    Introduction to theories and practice of science and nature curriculum for young children. Emphasis is placed on the planning, implementation and evaluation of developmentally appropriate activities and instructional materials. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2208
    Mathematics Activities for the Young Chi

    2 credit hours

    Introduction to theories and practice related to the curriculum area of mathematics for young children. Emphasis is placed on the development of mathematical thinking. Implementation and evaluation of developmentally appropriate activities and instructional materials are included. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2210
    The Young Child With Special Needs

    2 credit hours

    An introduction to child care services for young children (under 8 years of age) with special needs. Descriptions of special needs, curriculum, programs, services and current issues are included. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2211
    Child Health, Safety and Nutrition

    3 credit hours

    A comprehensive overview of current health, safety and nutritional needs of growing children. Appropriate methods to meet the needs of young children in group care settings are emphasized. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One. (3 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2220
    Early Childhood Education Practicum

    4 credit hours

    Practicum experience in the field of Early Childhood Education. Emphasizes the practical application of principles, practices, and theories of early childhood education while working with young children in a professional setting. Students will also participate in a weekly practicum seminar. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1100, Early Childhood Education and Care 1101, Early Childhood Education and Care 1102, Early Childhood Education and Care 1130, Early Childhood Education and Care 1140, Early Childhood Education and Care 2211, and Early Childhood Education and Care 2251 with a grade of C or better in each of the prerequisite courses or equivalent, and consent of instructor.

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2226
    Development of the School-Age Child

    2 credit hours

    A study of physical, cognitive and affective domains of the 6 to 12 year old child's growth and development. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2227
    Guidance of the School-Age Child

    2 credit hours

    A study of guidance practices that support the development of school-age children in group settings. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2228
    Activities for School-Age Children

    2 credit hours

    This course introduces students to the process of planning, implementing and evaluating activities for school-age children in a group setting. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2230
    Foundations of Early Childhood Education

    3 credit hours

    Early childhood education and childcare trends and issues including a historical and philosophical review of research. Includes a study of theories of early childhood education as reflected in program models. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2250
    Play and Learning of the Young Child

    3 credit hours

    An exploration of the significance of play experiences that promote growth and learning. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the adult and the child at play. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1101 (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2251
    Curriculum Planning for the Young Child

    3 credit hours

    The principles involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating developmentally appropriate curriculum. Development of curriculum based on the needs and interests of young children in group care will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1130 or equivalent and Early Childhood Education and Care 1140 or equivalent or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2252
    Child/Family/Commu Relations & Resources

    3 credit hours

    This course describes the knowledge and skills early childhood professionals need to build effective interrelationships with the child, family and community. Programs and services for children and their families are explored. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent (3 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2254
    Adm of EC Center-Program Operations

    3 credit hours

    An overview of early childhood program operations including legal and professional standards. Students explore licensing and accreditation standards in relation to an existing early childhood center. Design and management as well as storage and maintenance of indoor and outdoor environments are included. (3 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2255
    Adm of EC Center-Practices & Procedures

    3 credit hours

    Information about the management processes of early childhood programs. Fiscal and legal structures, community outreach programs, and early childhood program marketing, public relations and promotional strategies are included. (3 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2256
    Adm EC Center-Staff,/Families/Children

    3 credit hours

    Exploration of the knowledge and skill application of early childhood program staff management and supervision. Development of effective human relations with diverse groups is described. Early childhood leadership skills and child advocacy are included. (3 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2260
    Early Childhood Professional

    3 credit hours

    Explores the dimensions of becoming an early childhood professional including ethics, relationships with colleagues, time management, advocacy, critical reflection, and career development. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education and Care 1100 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2821
    Advanced Selected Topics I

    2 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: This course is designed for students nearing completion of the Early Childhood Education and Care program or for child care practitioners. Students should have attained minimum Department of Children and Family Services credit hours for a child care director position before enrolling in the course. (2 lecture hours)

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Early Childhood Education & Care 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Earth Science 1101 (IAI P1 907L)
    Physical Geology of Earth's Interior

    4 credit hours

    Processes important in understanding Earth's interior. Planetary segregation, heat flow, Earth's magnetic field, earthquakes, continental drift, paleomagnetism, seafloor spreading, mantle plumes, and crustal deformation are investigated in light of the unifying theory of plate tectonics. Physical and chemical properties of minerals and the genesis of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, and their relationship to the rock and tectonic cycles. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1102 (IAI P1 907L)
    Physical Geology of Earth's Surface

    4 credit hours

    Geological processes involved in the creation of a variety of landform systems and sedimentary deposits. Weathering, mass wasting, transport, deposition, depositional environments, sediment lithification, analysis and interpretation of topographic maps, cross-sections, and aerial photographs. Plate tectonic theory, volcanism, and rock and mineral forming processes are integrated. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1105 (IAI P1 908L)
    Environmental Geology

    4 credit hours

    A study of the impact of geological processes on society and the environmental consequences of the use of Earth resources by humans. Includes analyses of geologic hazards (including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, groundwater contamination, flooding) and the attempts made to evaluate and mitigate their risks to human populations. Special attention will be focused on environmental impacts of land-use and economic resource development. Recommended course: Mathematics 0481. Successful completion of high school algebra is assumed. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1110 (IAI P1 905L)
    Introduction to Meteorology

    4 credit hours

    A first look at various aspects of meteorology, including solar radiation, global circulation, environmental issues, winds, stability, precipitation processes, weather systems and severe weather. Basic physical principles, meteorological terminology, societal impacts, and weather analysis will be explored. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1111 (IAI P1 905)
    Climate and Global Change

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to the earth's climate, climate change and the interactions between climate and the global environment. Physical, chemical, biological and social factors contributing to climate and global change are investigated. Topics explored are: climate classifications, global warming and greenhouse effect, acid rain, ozone depletion, regional drought and cataclysmic climate change. Man-made climate change as opposed to natural variability, along with human responses to potential climate change are debated. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Earth Science 1115 (IAI P1 905L)
    Severe and Unusual Weather

    4 credit hours

    In-depth study of meteorological phenomena relating to thunderstorms, El Ni¤o/Southern Oscillation events, and tropical storms. Topics will include severe weather spotting, weather radar, atmospheric soundings, tornadogenesis, El Ni¤o, tropical meteorology, hurricanes and an introduction to numerical weather prediction. Basic physical principles, their relation to weather events, and weather's impact on society are also explored. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1116
    Weather Analysis and Forecasting I

    1 credit hours

    A study of day-to-day weather patterns with an emphasis on understanding the basics of meteorological processes and forecasting. Students learn to read weather reports and weather maps needed to analyze current conditions and forecast weather. Taking advantage of a fully operational weather laboratory, students monitor current weather conditions locally and across the nation. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1117
    Weather Analysis and Forecasting II

    1 credit hours

    A continuation of Weather Analysis and Forecasting I. Students continue investigating sources of data, learn to analyze raw images, and interpret numerical weather forecasts. Taking advantage of a fully-operational weather laboratory, students monitor current weather conditions locally and across the nation. Prerequisite: Earth Science 1116 or equivalent. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1119
    Weather Impacts and Preparedness

    3 credit hours

    An investigation of weather and climate impacts that affect various populations within the United States including snow, drought, floods, severe weather, and temperature extremes among other phenomena. Sociological impacts, preparedness, and warning and mitigation strategies will be discussed. (3 lecture hours)

  • Earth Science 1120 (IAI P1 906)
    Introduction to Astronomy

    3 credit hours

    Examines the history of astronomy, observations of astronomical phenomena and concepts, the structure and evolution of the solar system, the birth, life, and death of stars, properties of galaxies and main concepts of cosmology. Provides a basic understanding of matter and radiation. Recommended course: MATH 0481 and successful completion of high school algebra is assumed. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Earth Science 1122 (IAI P1 906L)
    Astronomy: The Solar System

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to the solar system using recently available astronomical data. Major topics include scale models, planetary properties, earth-sun relationships, lunar geology, terrestrial planets, jovian planets, natural satellites and ring systems, asteroids, comets, meteoroids, meteors, meteorites, interplanetary space probes and formation theories. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1124 (IAI P1 906L)
    Astronomy: Stars and Galaxies

    4 credit hours

    A study of stars, galaxies, deep space objects and cosmology utilizing the latest astronomical discoveries. Major topics include constellations, the Sun, stellar types, motions, parallax, magnitudes, luminosity, spectra, classifications, clusters, evolution, quasars, nebula, galaxy classification and composition, the Big Bang, inflation and cosmology. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1126 (IAI P1 906L)
    Observational Astronomy

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to observation of the heavens with emphasis on angular measurements, use of horizontal and equatorial systems of location, object identification, and classification using data from sidereal time reports, naked eyes, binoculars, optical telescopes, radio telescopes and space telescopes. Use of planisphere, celestial globes, first-hand and robic telescopic data and telescopic tools. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1130 (IAI P1 905L)
    Introduction to Oceanography

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to oceanography that focuses on the dominating influence the World Ocean has upon earth processes. Topics include ocean basin evolution, sea water chemistry and physics, interrelationships between the ocean and atmosphere, waves, currents, tides, coastal development, marine communities and human impacts. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1135 (IAI P1 905L)
    Water Science-Fundamentals of Hydrology

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to the water cycle, the dynamic processes of surface water, and ground water. Students investigate and analyze the impacts of population growth, urbanization, weather, and climate upon hydrological processes and water resource sustainability. One field trip is required. For any student concerned about water resources and those with intended majors in geology, hydrology, meteorology, environmental sciences/engineering, or resource management. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1140 (IAI P1 905L)
    Fundamentals of Earth Science

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to the study of the Earth as a planet. Topics from the disciplines of astronomy, meteorology, oceanography and geology are explored to develop an appreciation of our planet as an integrated system. Includes analyses of the dynamic processes of the Earth's interior, surface, oceans, atmosphere and astronomical surroundings. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 1141 (IAI P1 905)
    Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    A non-laboratory introduction to the study of the Earth as a planet intended for non-science majors. Topics from the disciplines of astronomy, meteorology, oceanography, and geology are explored to develop an appreciation of our planet as an integrated system. Includes analyses of the dynamic processes of the Earth's interior, surface, oceans, atmosphere, and astronomical surroundings. Students receive credit for either 1140 or 1141 but not both. Prerequisite: Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better, or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score. (3 lecture hours)

  • Earth Science 1800
    Special Project

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the Earth Science discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific earth science topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in earth science. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of earth science concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One

  • Earth Science 1820
    Selected Topics I

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 3 lecture hours)

  • Earth Science 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Earth Science 2102
    Origin and Evolution of the Earth

    4 credit hours

    Processes and geologic events that are important in understanding the origin and evolution of the earth. Origin of the solar system, planetary segregation, absolute and relative age dating methods, the sedimentary record, evolution of the continents, oceans, and atmosphere. Plate tectonics, crustal evolution and biologic development over the course of geologic time will be a unifying theme. Prerequisite: Earth Science 1101, Earth Science 1102, Earth Science 1130 or Earth Science 1140, all courses require a grade of C or better or equivalent (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 2103
    Geologic Field Investigations

    3 credit hours

    Geologic field investigation involving the stratigraphy, structural geology and economic geology of a selected region within the United States or abroad. Basic methods of geologic field work including rock and outcrop description, sampling methods, measurement of stratigraphic sections, strike and dip measurements, orienteering and map interpretation. A supervised field investigation involving 10 to 14 days of outdoor field work and pre- and post-trip class meetings. Prerequisite: Earth Science 1101, Earth Science 1102 or Earth Science 1140, or equivalent (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 2110
    Intermediate Meteorology

    4 credit hours

    A quantitative first look at the science of meteorology. Physical concepts will be examined using algebraic methods to prepare students for material using higher mathematics. Operational, physical and dynamical meteorology are discussed to give students an overall understanding of atmospheric science. Equations of motion, thermodynamics and the primitive equations will be among the topics covered. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1431 (or college equivalent) or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score and either Earth Science 1110 or Earth Science 1115 or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours)

  • Earth Science 2115
    Mesoscale Meteorology

    4 credit hours

    In-depth study of meteorological phenomena with short temporal and small spatial scales. Topics will include tools for mesoscale analysis, mesoscale modeling, thermally-forced circulations, fog, mesoscale winter events, and the morphology of convective systems including squall lines, mesoscale convective systems and supercells and their associated threats including flash floods and tornadoes. Other topics of current research interest will also be covered. Prerequisite: Earth Science 1115 or equivalent or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours)

  • Earth Science 2116
    Adv Weather Analysis & Forecasting I

    1 credit hours

    A continuation of Weather Analysis and Forecasting II, EARTH-1117. Emphasis is on independent analysis of weather events, forecast preparation and mastery of hand data analysis. Taking advantage of a fully operational weather laboratory, students monitor current weather conditions locally and across the nation. Prerequisite: Earth Science 1117 and Mathematics 0481 (or college equivalent) with a grade of C or better, or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or a qualifying A.C.T. math score (2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 2117
    Adv Weather Analysis & Forecasting II

    1 credit hours

    A continuation of Advanced Weather Analysis and Forecasting I. Students prepare a weekly forecast for the Chicago metropolitan area generally and DuPage County specifically, and track and evaluate their forecasting accuracy. Taking advantage of a fully operational weather laboratory, students monitor current weather conditions locally and across the nation. Prerequisite: Earth Science 2116 or equivalent (2 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 2118
    Severe Weather Lab

    2 credit hours

    An in-depth study of severe weather forecasting and analysis. An emphasis is placed on hand analysis of raw data, assessing short term numerical weather models, and nowcasting. Students monitor events prior to and during severe weather events using real time radar and other data sources. Students gain a better understanding of severe weather initiation and evolution. Local field trips to observe severe weather first-hand may be included. This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Earth Science 1115 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (4 lab hours)

  • Earth Science 2800
    Special Project

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the Earth Science discipline, while building upon academic knowledge and skills acquired in introductory-level Earth Science classes. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific Earth Science topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in Earth Science. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical applications of more complex earth science concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of the instructor.

  • Earth Science 2820
    Advanced Selected Topics I

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor. (1 to 3 lecture hours)

  • Earth Science 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Earth Science 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Earth Science 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Earth Science 2871
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Economics 1110
    Consumer Economics and Personal Finance

    3 credit hours

    An overview of personal and family financial planning. Emphasis is placed on financial recordkeeping, consumer spending, tax planning, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement and estate planning. (3 lecture hours)

  • Economics 1800
    Special Project

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates and experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent (to be determined by the disciplines). This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.)

  • Economics 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Economics 2200 (IAI S3 900)
    Principles of Economics

    3 credit hours

    A survey course addressing macroeconomics and microeconomics. A study of product and resource markets, market structures, interactions between government and firms, the determinants of economic activity, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy implications, international trade, and international finance. This course is not recommended for Economics majors or those pursuing a baccalaureate degree in any field of business. Not for credit if credit earned in Economics 2201 or Economics 2202 or their equivalent. (3 lecture hours)

  • Economics 2201 (IAI S3 901)
    Macroeconomics and the Global Economy

    3 credit hours

    A study of the major factors that determine levels of economic activity. Emphasis is placed on resource allocation, national production, demand and supply, income levels, government, money and the banking system, policy implications, economic growth, international finance and exchange rates. A score of 53 or higher in algebra domain of Math Placement Test is recommended. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Economics 2202 (IAI S3 902)
    Microeconomics and the Global Economy

    3 credit hours

    A study of consumer behavior, supply and demand, price determination, market structures, factor pricing, international trade and finance, and economic development. Special topics may include agricultural economics, the economics of risk, environmental economics and alternative economic systems. A score of 53 or higher in algebra domain of Math Placement Test and successful completion of Economics 2201 are recommended. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Economics 2210
    Money and Banking

    3 credit hours

    A descriptive, historical and analytical introduction to the role of money, monetary policy, financial institutions and central banks in the United States and internationally. Prerequisite: Economics 2201 and Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Economics 2220
    Comparative Economic Systems

    3 credit hours

    A comparison of the principal economic systems, their theoretical foundations and historical backgrounds. Economic analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the capitalist, socialist and communist systems. Developing nations are studied within their own unique paradigm and with current strategies for economic development. Prerequisite: Economics 2201 or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Economics 2800
    Special Project

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the discipline, while building upon academic knowledge and skills acquired in introductory-level classes. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporated an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent (to be determined by the disciplines). This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of more complex discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of the instructor

  • Economics 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Economics 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Economics 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Economics 2871
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Education 1100
    Introduction to Education

    3 credit hours

    Provides an introduction to teaching as a profession in the American education system. Offers a variety of perspectives on education including historical, philosophical, social, legal and ethical issues in a diverse society. Includes organizational structure and school governance. A 15 clock-hour field experience is required. Field experience placement is dependent on degree pursued and/or interest and grade level area. (3 lecture hours)

  • Education 1101
    School Procedures I

    3 credit hours

    A field experience course with each student spending a minimum of 40 clock hours in a classroom, preferably in a diverse setting. The weekly seminar focuses on the development of human relations and problem-solving skills necessary for an effective classroom. Students examine various policies, procedures and routine activities that are part of the teacher's role. Education 1100 strongly recommended (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Education 1102
    School Procedures II

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the classroom focusing on diversity in learning styles, assessment and evaluation. Student will spend a minimum of 30 clock hours in a field experience setting. Education 1101 is recommended (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Education 1105
    Career Development

    2 credit hours

    Focus on integrating career development into important life choices. Emphasis will be given to helping students learn the skills involved in developing career awareness, making career decisions and taking career action in a changing work environment. (2 lecture hours)

  • Education 1110
    Interpersonal Skills for Life and Work

    2 credit hours

    Emphasizes understanding the student's style of communicating, exploring options and decreasing self-defeating behaviors. Includes awareness of communication variances among ethnic, racial and gender groups. Through an experiential approach, students have an opportunity to develop more satisfying and effective interpersonal skills for enhancing personal and work relationships, self-esteem, and understanding of behavior differences among persons from diverse backgrounds. (2 lecture hours)

  • Education 1115
    College Success Skills

    2 credit hours

    An introduction to academic success skills necessary for meeting the challenge of a college education. Students explore and apply note-taking strategies, listening skills, test preparation, test-anxiety strategies, time management, goal setting, and awareness of potential that can assist in achieving their goals in higher education. (2 lecture hours)

  • Education 1150
    School Resources

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to instructional media used in classrooms and learning centers. Emphasis is on current and emerging theories of learning with instructional technology and how to best integrate, utilize and adapt technology as a resource in teaching and learning. A variety of media are incorporated: display boards, projectors, recorders, videotapes, computers, software, e-mail, Internet, archival data files, Elmo, CDs, course management systems, and electronic data storage are among the resources reviewed. Practical application of media in traditional and non-traditional learning environments addressed. (3 lecture hours)

  • Education 1800
    Special Project

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent (to be determined by the disciplines). This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) This course may be taken four times for credit.

  • Education 1820
    Selected Topics I

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected education topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (1 to 3 lecture hours)

  • Education 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Education 2201
    Education for Exceptional Children

    3 credit hours

    A survey course that presents the historical, legal, and philosophical foundations of special education. The primary focus will be on children with disabilities, but will include children at-risk, and children from culturally diverse backgrounds. Course work will include the categories of exceptionality as identified by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), their characteristics, and collaborative strategies to address their needs. Students will spend a minimum of 40 hours observing and assisting in special education settings. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Education 2202
    Introduction to Learning Disabilities

    3 credit hours

    This course provides an overview of learning disabilities and includes etiology and diagnostic procedures, classification, characteristic and teaching strategies. Course work also includes discussion of service delivery models and strategies for meeting the needs of students with learning disabilities in the least restrictive environment. Recommended: Education 2201 (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Education 2211
    Survey of Literature for Children

    3 credit hours

    A study of children's literature representing a range of literary types. The literature is evaluated for age and interest appropriateness. Students may do a concentrated study of a specific age group within the 1 to 12 years age range. A 10-hour service learning component is required. (3 lecture hours)

  • Education 2700
    Best Practices in Online Education

    3 credit hours

    Distance education and an online learning experience from a student and faculty perspective, including learning management systems, principles and theories of online education, key competencies, and best practices for successful distance education. (3 lecture hours)

  • Education 2720
    Course Design for Online Education

    4 credit hours

    Practical experience designing, managing and facilitating a unit of instruction online using a learning management system. Learners will focus on principles of instructional design, assessment methods, and online tools that promote active, collaborative learning. (4 lecture hours)

  • Education 2740
    Multimedia for Online Teaching

    3 credit hours

    Principles of visual literacy and multimedia theory as they produce a variety of multimedia projects to be used in an online environment. (3 lecture hours)

  • Education 2760
    Teach W/Social Media & Collaboratn Tools

    3 credit hours

    Examination of collaborative pedagogies, tools, and theory to enhance student learning in an online environment. Learners will experience and evaluate a variety of online social networking tools, apply appropriate tools to a unit of instruction, and create an online professional learning network. (3 lecture hours)

  • Education 2780
    Video Applications in Education

    3 credit hours

    Use of video applications and research to enhance student learning in an online environment. Students will use video cameras and editing software to create and publish a variety of video projects appropriate to educational applications. Special focus will be given to the benefits and concerns of video sharing in the learning environment. (3 lecture hours)

  • Education 2800
    Special Project

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent (to be determined by the disciplines). This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of the instructor

  • Education 2820
    Advanced Selected Topics I

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor. (1 to 3 lecture hours)

  • Education 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Education 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Education 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Education 2871
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1101
    Survey of Automation

    3 credit hours

    Automation technology, including robotics, programmable controllers (PLC), process control instrumentation, industrial electricity, plastics, motion controls, vision systems, and automatic guided vehicles. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1110
    Motor & Generator Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Basic principles for Alternating Current (AC) and Direct Current (DC) motors and generators. Motor and generator theory, operation, ratings, speeds, and enclosures. Analysis of efficiency, power service factors, and frame sizes. Motor control concepts, including ladder and wiring drawings. Control devices, including sensors, control transformers, and starters. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1120
    Residential Wiring

    3 credit hours

    All facets of correct wiring methods and techniques, based on the National Electrical Code (NEC). Room by room, circuit by circuit, installation and inspection with an emphasis on symbols, branch circuits, service drops, ground-fault circuit-interrupters (GFCI), low voltage circuits, and security system circuitry. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1130
    Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Industrial electricity, circuits, devices, and power. The use of instruments on circuit analysis and test equipment. (2 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1140
    Commercial and Industrial Wiring

    3 credit hours

    Designed to provide the electrician with tips and techniques for wiring in commercial buildings, offices, stores, manufacturing and other industrial environments. High voltage branch feeders, motors, appliance service, special systems and overcurrent protection are covered. Emphasis is on the National Electrical Code (NEC), minimum requirements pertaining to high and medium voltage motors, wiring, switchgear and power distribution. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1141
    Hydraulics and Pneumatics

    3 credit hours

    Principles of fluids at rest and in motion. Hydraulic and pneumatic pumps, motors, cylinders, boosters, valves, regulators, and circuitry to transmit and control power. (3 lecture hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1150
    National Electrical Code

    3 credit hours

    An overview of the current national electrical code (NEC) with emphasis on reading, interpretation and revisions. Definitions and terminology are covered. (3 lecture hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1171
    Introduction to Robotic Technology

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to the basic theory and operation of robots in industrial automation. Basic robot and work-place design, safety procedures, and robotic applications are studied. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1190
    Intro to Programmable Logic Controllers

    3 credit hours

    A survey of programmable logic controllers (PLC). Terminology, basic memory structure, I/O's (input/outputs), processors, and programming devices. Basics of programming and applications. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1300
    Introduction to Fiber Optics

    3 credit hours

    Modern theories and applications of fiber optics. Course includes history, information transmission, advantages and disadvantages of fiber, optics, and practical applications. (3 lecture hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1400
    Maintenance Management Systems

    3 credit hours

    Overview of various computerized maintenance management systems. Topics include storeroom inventory, preventive maintenance procedures and scheduling, predictive maintenance costs, records and tracking, International Standards Organization (ISO) certification; training and vendor records. (3 lecture hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1410
    Preventive and Predictive Maintenance

    3 credit hours

    Fundamentals of preventive and predictive maintenance using vibration analysis, equipment history, repair records and tracking systems. Procedures for identifying and implementing maintenance practices. Scheduled maintenance vs. predictive maintenance, charts and predictive maintenance, analysis of dimension signatures for bearings, motors and pumps, and development of anticipatory failure analysis. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1420
    Drive Components

    2 credit hours

    A hands-on approach to gears and gearing systems, chains and sprockets, belts and sheaves, brakes and clutches, couplings and coupling alignment, bearings and lubrication. (1 lecture hour, 3 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1820
    Selected Topics I

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. May be taken 3 times for credit. (1 to 3 lecture hours, 2 to 4 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline, and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (8 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2310
    Fiber Optic Applications

    3 credit hours

    Designed to provide industrial type simulations and emulate the processes found in real life applications. Topics include connector installation and splicing, fusing and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: Electro-Mechanical Technology 1300 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2410
    Programmable Controller II (PLC II)

    3 credit hours

    Data manipulation within programmable controllers (PLC) including data transfer, arithmetic functions, shift registers and sequencers. Topics such as analog to digital conversion, operator interface input/output (I/O) bus systems, advanced PLC cards, factory information systems, and troubleshooting of applications. Prerequisite: Electro-Mechanical Technology 1190 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2420
    Programmable Controller III

    3 credit hours

    Advanced topics in programmable controllers (PLCs) such as data highways, programming modules, and on-line programming using manufacturer's advanced software, process conversions to programmable controls and critical areas of process controls. Simulated applications of real-time processes comprise the majority of the course work, such as injection molding machines, and transfer pad printing. Prerequisite: Electro-Mechanical Technology 2410 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2430
    Advanced Industrial Automation

    3 credit hours

    A systems approach to industrial automation. Bus structure, memory devices, digital and analog input/output (I/O) devices, data acquisition systems, digital transmission standards and networks. Emphasis is placed on multiple system design, integration and troubleshooting. Prerequisites: Electro-Mechanical Technology 2410 and Electro-Mechanical Technology 2520 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2510
    Process and Automation Controls

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to language, symbols and principles of process control instrumentation with emphasis on temperature, pressure, level and flow measurement, including calibration of transmitters, process feedback and feedforward loops. Discussion of hazardous area classifications. Introduction to controllers, controller modes and tuning processes. Included are deadband adjustments, proportional (gain), integral (reset), and derivative (rate) calibration. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2520
    Advanced Process and Automation Controls

    3 credit hours

    An in-depth study of force, stress, strain, linear position, weight and mass measurement. Also included are analytical process measurements such as pH, conductivity and resistivity. Major emphasis is given to control elements in process loops and electrical, pneumatic and hydraulic actuators. Introduction to digital process controllers and in-depth study of piping and instrumentation drawings (P&ID). Additionally, a comprehensive study of intrinsic safety and instrument purging is included. Prerequisite: Electro-Mechanical Technology 1190 and Electro-Mechanical Technology 2510 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2600
    Motion Control: Servo & Stepper Motor

    2 credit hours

    An introduction to motion control, including servo motors, DC servo drivers with control circuits, alternating current (AC) motors, steppers, actuators, sensors, fundamentals of basic control principles, and industrial and engineering applications of motion control systems. Prerequisite: Electro-Mechanical Technology 1190 or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 3 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2610
    Machine Vision & Artificial Intelligence

    2 credit hours

    Advanced topics in computer vision for robots, and an introduction to artificial intelligence (AI). Course covers the following main areas: sensors, manipulators, and pattern recognition and vision systems, software and control. Object-oriented programming languages and vision system robotics software will be covered in the laboratory. Prerequisite: Electro-Mechanical Technology 1190 or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 3 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2620
    Critical Thinking in Tech Applications

    2 credit hours

    Manufacturing processes and parameters that contribute to the system troubleshooting procedures. Through case studies and practical application, a system of thinking is developed to determine fault isolation and failure. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2630
    Systems Troubleshooting

    2 credit hours

    Examines troubleshooting techniques, time-proven tips and aids to troubleshooting, and use of functional block diagrams in the ICO (input-conversion-output) method of fault isolation. Emphasis is on breakdown maintenance. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2863
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)

    3 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 225 clock hours for three semester credit hours. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2864
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)

    4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 300 clock hours for four semester credit hours. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Electro-Mechanical Technology 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Electronics Technology 1100
    Electricity and Electronics Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Basic concepts in electronics are studied. An overview of direct and alternating current, circuit laws, components, troubleshooting, and use of test equipment. Hands-on experience, projects, and practical applications are included. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1101
    Circuits I

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to basic concepts in electronics. An exploration of the basics in electricity and electronics. Topics include an overview of direct and alternating current, circuit laws, components, troubleshooting and use of test equipment. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1100 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1102
    Circuits II

    4 credit hours

    Advanced concepts in circuit electronics. Topics include filtering, resonance, time and frequency response, troubleshooting and use of test equipment. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects are included. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1101 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1110
    Introduction to Technology

    2 credit hours

    Students will develop an understanding of the fields of technology such as computers, telecommunications, electronics, mechanics and other related fields. Through project based hands-on learning activities, students will have an opportunity to apply theory to real problems as they develop skills in solving technological problems. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1111
    Introduction to Robotics

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to fundamental robotic concepts, basic robot characteristics, and review of robotic applications. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1100 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1118
    Calculus for Electronics

    2 credit hours

    Basic principles of differential and integral calculus and differential equations applicable to circuit analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1432 (or college equivalent) or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test or qualifying A.C.T. math score and Electronics Technology 1102 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1120
    Electronic Documentation

    2 credit hours

    Introduction to electronic drafting and documentation. Electronic schematics and documentation, printed circuit board documentation, and drafting techniques using computer assisted drafting and design (CADD). Components, symbols, and diagrams. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1130
    Electronics Materials and Fabrication

    2 credit hours

    Electronic equipment construction, assembly, repair, cable soldering techniques and fabrication. Coverage of the fundamentals of electronic design, fabrication and documentation, delineating various troubleshooting and test procedures, hands-on experience with connectors, fasteners, troubleshooting and testing of electronic systems. Testing of integrated circuits and personal computer boards. Concepts reinforced through student projects. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1100 with a grade of C or better or equvalent or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1141
    Digital Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to basic concepts in digital electronics. Basic discrete electronics, digital logic, circuit laws, components, troubleshooting and use of test equipment. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized.(2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1142
    Digital Components and Architecture

    3 credit hours

    A continuation of Digital Fundamentals. Digital components, digital architecture, digital systems, troubleshooting and use of test equipment. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1141 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1151
    Electronic Devices and Applications

    4 credit hours

    Basic concepts in electronic devices. Topics include diode and transistor fundamentals and applications, operational amplifier circuits, measurement and control circuits troubleshooting, and use of test equipment. Hands-on experience, practical applications, and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1101 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1152
    Electronic Devices and Applications 2

    4 credit hours

    A continuation of Electronic Devices and Applications I. Advanced concepts in electronic devices. Topics include diode and transistor applications, troubleshooting and use of test equipment. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1151 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1161
    Electronic Communications

    4 credit hours

    Basic concepts in telecommunication electronics and circuits. Fundamentals of analog communications, such as amplitude modulation (AM), frequency modulation (FM), television and radio fundamentals, troubleshooting and use of test equipment. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1151 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1162
    Electronic Communication 2

    4 credit hours

    A continuation of Electronic Communication 1. Advanced concepts in analog and digital communications and digital telecommunication circuits. Transmission lines, antennas, cell systems, networks, fiber-optics, troubleshooting and use of telecommunication test equipment. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1161 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1201
    Renewable Energy Fundamentals

    2 credit hours

    Survey of renewable energy technology including wind turbines and solar photovoltaic (PV) power technology. (1 lecture hour, 3 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1221
    Intro- Biomedical Instrumentn Technology

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to operation and maintenance of biomedical equipment and instrumentation. Basic terminology, fundamental measurements, recording and monitoring of medical instrumentation will be covered. Recommended: Electronics Technology 1100 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1820
    Selected Topics I

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (1 to 3 lecture hours, 2 to 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2001
    Green Energy Systems

    3 credit hours

    Advanced study of principles of operation, testing, and diagnosis of green energy systems. These systems are evaluated both with discussion of theory, hands-on lab analysis and alternative energy systems feasibility study will be included of actual green energy systems. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1100 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or Electronics Technology 1201 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2112
    Motor Control

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to fundamental motor control concepts, basic control characteristics and review of control strategies. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1151 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2201
    Applied Electronics

    5 credit hours

    A continuation of Electronic Devices and Applications II course. Advanced semiconductor circuits, linear and nonlinear op-amps, analog signal conditioning, and linear power supplies. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1152 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2202
    Advanced Applied Electronics

    5 credit hours

    A continuation of Applied Electronics course. Practical semiconductor circuits, linear and nonlinear amplifiers, analog signal processors and power supplies. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 2201 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2205
    Electronics Assembly Technology

    3 credit hours

    Basic skills of assembly electronics technology, surface mount technology, techniques for electronic product assembly and manufacturing processes for electronics-based equipment and products, and quality assurance in electronics. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1130 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2210
    Advanced Calculus for Electronics

    2 credit hours

    A continuation of Calculus for Electronics. Principles of differential and integral calculus and differential equations applicable to circuit analysis. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1102 and Electronics Technology 1118 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2220
    Elect Instruments Measurements & Control

    3 credit hours

    Methods of measurements of basic electric and electronic parameters. Study of circuits and characteristics of major electronic instruments. Basic control circuits. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1141 and Electronics Technology 1151 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2221
    Electronic Instruments, Measurements and

    3 credit hours

    A continuation of the study of biomedical instrumentation. Students will learn how to inspect, repair, and maintain biomedical instrumentation and equipment. Internal electronic circuitry and typical clinical environments are discussed. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1221 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2231
    Digital Computer Electronics

    4 credit hours

    Advanced concepts in digital computer electronics, computer architecture, computer circuit analysis and synthesis, computer organization, and microprocessor programming. Hands-on experience, practical applications, and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisites: Electronics Technology 1100 and Electronics Technology 1142 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 6 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2241
    Wireless Telecommunications 1

    3 credit hours

    Basic concepts in wireless electronics and circuits. Fundamentals of wireless telecommunication systems, frequency spectrum, cellular radio, troubleshooting, and use of telecommunication test equipment. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1162 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2242
    Wireless Telecommunications 2

    3 credit hours

    A continuation of Wireless Telecommunications I. Concepts in wireless electronics and wireless systems. Analysis of wireless telecommunication systems, personal telecommunication systems, and satellite and wireless networks. Hands-on experience, practical applications, and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 2241 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2245
    Programmable Logic Devices

    4 credit hours

    Introduction to digital systems programming. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) and Complex Programmable Logical Devices (CPLD) are used in this course to develop sample applications. These state-of-the-art devices are programmed using the Verilog and VHDL (Very High Density Programming Language) languages, popular in science and industry today. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1141 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2255
    Industrial Controls

    3 credit hours

    Introduction of basic concepts in industrial electronics. Topics include an overview of transducers and signal conditioning. Troubleshooting and use of test equipment. Principles and fundamental laws of control technology and industrial electronics are included. Prerequisites: Electronics Technology 1141 and Electronics Technology 1151 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2261
    Digital Circuits and Systems

    4 credit hours

    Introduction to basic concepts in digital circuits and systems, investigation of all phases of troubleshooting and implementation of reliable digital systems. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1141 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2262
    Introduction to Microprocessors

    4 credit hours

    Introduction to basic concepts in microprocessor systems. Architecture of microprocessor systems, and investigation of all phases of troubleshooting and implementation of reliable microprocessor systems. Hands-on experience, practical applications and projects. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1101 and Electronics Technology 1141 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2273
    Embedded Systems & Microcntrlr Program

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to embedded systems applications involving real-time programming of microcontrollers and digital to analog conversion. Hands-on experience includes programming Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) microcontrollers, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) circuits, and digital signal processing using Operation Amplifiers, Digital Signal Processing (DSP), and Phase Locked Loop (PLL) chips. Prerequisite: Electronics Technology 1141 with a grade of C or better or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Electronics Technology 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Electronics Technology 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Engineering 1101 (IAI EGR 941)
    Engineering Graphics and Design

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to engineering, engineering graphics and design. Topics include orthographic projection, isometric and oblique drawing, geometrical constructions, dimensioning, tolerances, basic shop operations, detailing and assembly drawing. Also descriptive geometry, spatial relationships of points, lines and planes in orthographic projection, and graphical presentation of data. Methods include free hand sketching, instrumental drawing and computer aided design. Both two dimensional computer aided design and solid modeling are included. Plane geometry is recommended. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category Three (1 lecture hour, 5 lab hours)

  • Engineering 1820
    Selected Topics I

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 3 lecture hours)

  • Engineering 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Engineering 2201 (IAI EGR 942)
    Statics

    3 credit hours

    Force and moment vectors in two and three dimensions. Equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Analysis of trusses, frames, machines and beams. First and second moments of inertia, centroids, distributed forces, and mass moments of inertia. Friction and virtual work. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2231 or college equivalent (3 lecture hours)

  • Engineering 2202 (IAI EGR 943)
    Dynamics

    3 credit hours

    Kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Absolute and relative motion. Force, mass, acceleration, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and vibration. Prerequisite: Engineering 2201 (3 lecture hours)

  • Engineering 2203 (IAI EGR 945)
    Mechanics of Materials

    3 credit hours

    Analysis of stress, strain and deflection in machine and structural elements (axial, shear, torsion and bending loads). Stress and strain transformation using Mohr's Circle. Combined loading, repeated loading, theories of failure, related mechanical properties, and column buckling. Design of shafts, beams and columns. Elementary stress measurement devices. Prerequisite: Engineering 2201 (3 lecture hours)

  • Engineering 2205
    Engineering Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Analysis of thermodynamic processes and systems. Engineering implications of the properties of ideal and real gases and vapors in thermal systems. Zeroth, first and second laws of thermodynamics, power and refrigeration systems, entropy and vapor power systems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2233 or college equivalent (3 lecture hours)

  • Engineering 2210 (IAI EGR 931L)
    Circuit Analysis and Theory

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to engineering circuit analysis and design. Topics include basic laws and concepts of linear circuits, analysis of direct current and alternating current circuits by mesh and nodal analysis, the operational amplifier, the inductor and capacitor, transients analysis, phasors, impedance, average and root-mean-square values, power and transfer functions. Hands-on lab is included. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2270 or college equivalent and Physics 2112 or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Engineering 2213 (IAI EGR 932)
    Introduction to Digital Systems

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to computer engineering. Digital circuit design with discrete and integrated circuit components. Binary arithmetic, codes, bases, number systems, logic elements and Boolean functions. Analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential networks. Digital computer basics, machine level programming and microprocessors. Includes hands-on lab. A programming course or programming experience is recommended. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category Three (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Engineering 2820
    Advanced Selected Topics I

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor. (1 to 3 lecture hours)

  • Engineering 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Engineering 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Engineering 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Engineering 2871
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • English 0480
    Preparation for College Reading

    4 credit hours

    Builds the foundational reading skills necessary to prepare for college-level reading. Develops active reading habits that lead to comprehension and that introduce critical reading. Students read a wide variety of texts and show how the texts relate to their own lives as well as enhance their understanding of the world. This course may require use of academic support services. This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the Reading Pre-Course placement test. (4 lecture hours)

  • English 0481
    Approaches to College Reading I

    4 credit hours

    Continues to develop the reading skills necessary for college-level reading. Emphasizes the role reading plays in acquiring new information and extends literal comprehension to more complex reading tasks required for difficult texts. This course may require use of academic support services. This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the Reading Pre-Course placement test (4 lecture hours)

  • English 0482
    Approaches to College Reading II

    4 credit hours

    Focuses primarily on content area reading to prepare students for the challenges of reading in college. Students begin to read critically to determine the purpose, point of view, audience, and message conveyed by an author, to trace the development of the line of reasoning, and to identify and evaluate the rhetorical devices used to convey a point. Also includes vocabulary development and reader-response activities. This course may require use of academic support services. This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the Reading Pre-Course placement test. (4 lecture hours)

  • English 0490
    Basic Writing

    4 credit hours

    Build confidence and fluency in writing and the ability to generate well-developed texts. Students will understand how their texts fit in with a larger text-based world by developing a sense of audience and purpose. Classes are workshop-intensive sessions. Because of the strong relationship between writing and reading, students are immersed in reading activities. This course may be taken three times for credit. Prerequisite: Mandatory testing and appropriate score on the Writing Placement Test as determined by the English faculty (4 lecture hours)

  • English 0491
    Approaches to College Writing I

    4 credit hours

    The first of two developmental writing courses designed to prepare students for ENGLI-1101. Focuses on creating effective sentences and paragraphs within the context of writing short (250 - 350-word) essays, and on developing critical thinking skills. This course may be taken three times for credit. Prerequisite: An appropriate score on the English Placement test (4 lecture hours)

  • English 0492
    Approaches to College Writing II

    4 credit hours

    The second of two developmental writing courses designed to prepare students for ENGLI-1101. Focuses on composing longer (500-word) essays and on further developing critical thinking skills. This course may be taken three times for credit. Prerequisite: English 0491 with a grade of C or higher or an appropriate score on the English Placement test (4 lecture hours)

  • English 1060
    Reading & Writing in the Disciplines

    1 credit hours

    Students will practice reading strategies and writing techniques that help them be successful in a specific discipline at the college level. Assignments will be based on content-area course materials. A specific content-area course must be identified as the focus for this course. This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (1 lecture hour)

  • English 1070
    ESL Composition Supplement

    1 credit hours

    Allows students who are currently enrolled in a composition course to identify areas of writing development that will help them succeed in their course. Focuses on the writing process, grammar, and vocabulary. Designed for students whose first or primary language is not Engllish. This course may be taken four times for credit. (1 lecture hour)

  • English 1080
    Effective Workplace Writing

    1 credit hours

    Improves workplace writing skills. Emphasizes techniques that produce clear, effective communication. Assignments and materials will be based on the tasks the student must complete in his/her workplace. This course may be taken four times for credit. (1 lecture hour)

  • English 1090
    Style Development

    1 credit hours

    Provides support in developing style, tone, and clarity of expression. Guides students to choose words to avoid cliches, wordiness, informality, and confusion. Emphasizes clear, consistent and direct writing for a vareity of tasks, especially for academic purposes. This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (1 lecture hour)

  • English 1101 (IAI C1 900)
    English Composition 1

    3 credit hours

    The first of two courses in the one-year composition sequence. Introduces students to college-level writing as a process of developing and supporting a thesis in an organized essay. Requires students to read and think critically. Emphasizes using appropriate style and voice as well as the conventions of standard English and citation. Prerequisite: Mandatory testing. Prior to enrollment, student must have A) a satisfactory score, as determined by the English faculty, on an English Composition entrance test, and B) evidence of having met the Reading Competency Requirement. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1102 (IAI C1 901R)
    English Composition 2

    3 credit hours

    Second course in two-course composition sequence. Students continue to develop experience in reading, thinking and writing critically by writing essays that demonstrate ability to analyze and evaluate the ideas of others and integrate them into their own writing. Reinforces student experience with the conventions of standard written English and the conventions of documentation while developing student ability to carry out independently the proper method and responsibilities of research. Prerequisite: English 1101 with a grade of C or better (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1105
    Writing for the Workplace

    3 credit hours

    Focuses on the processes and strategies for creating written communication within a workplace setting. Examines audience awareness, stylistic conventions, and document design. Emphasizes the preparation of a variety of written documents, such as resumes, internal and external correspondence, descriptions, proposals, instructions, summaries, and reports. Designed primarily for students enrolled in career-technical programs. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score, as determined by the English faculty, on the English Composition Entrance Exam required prior to enrollment in English 1105. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1110
    Technical Writing

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to instructional writing, proposals, recommendation reports, and a procedures or operator's manual. Also includes some instruction in design, layout and graphics. Intended for students entering today's technologically advanced work place. (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1115
    Writing for the Web

    3 credit hours

    Concentrates on writing techniques that combine elements of technical writing and simple grammar and usage basics to develop an effective writing style appropriate for business and personal web sites. (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1125
    Linguistics

    3 credit hours

    The first course in the scientific study of language. Includes a systematic analysis of word formation, syntax and semantics in the English language and a study of the often universal ways that humans make meaning through language. Also includes study of related issues of language variation, particularly historical development and child language acquisition. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1130 (IAI H3 900)
    Introduction to Literature

    3 credit hours

    This course develops students' understanding of the elements of literature, including character, theme, point of view, symbol, imagery, tone and rhythm. Reading selections include short fiction, poetry and drama. The course emphasizes students' appreciation of literature as an art form. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1135 (IAI F2 908)
    Introduction to Film Art

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the basic elements of film as an art form, including cinematography, mise-en-scene, movement, editing and sound. The historical development and social impact of film are also considered. Through screening, discussion and critical evaluation of selected films, students develop their knowledge of film as an art form. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1150 (IAI H3 901)
    Short Fiction

    3 credit hours

    A study of selected short stories. The stories are read and discussed to increase students' understanding and enjoyment of this literary form. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1151 (IAI H3 901)
    Novel

    3 credit hours

    A study of selected novels. The novels are read and analyzed to increase students' understanding and enjoyment of this literary form. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1152 (IAI H3 903)
    Poetry

    3 credit hours

    Introduces students to the nature and elements of poetry through reading, analysis and discussion. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1153 (IAI H3 902)
    Drama

    3 credit hours

    A study of selected plays. At least one of the plays will be currently in production in the area, and students will attend a performance. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1154 (IAI HF 908)
    Film As Literature

    3 credit hours

    Introduces methods of analyzing and interpreting the literary aspects of film in order to enhance enjoyment and understanding. Includes the comparison of literary and film techniques. Through the study of a selected variety of motion pictures, the course builds sensitivity to the uses of verbal and visual language and to the characteristics of various genre and non-genre films. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1156
    Science Fiction

    3 credit hours

    Study of science fiction as a literary genre and as a means of exploring contemporary concerns. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1157
    Children's Literature

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to literature for and by children, with emphasis upon imaginative literature, including fantasy, fairy tales, myths and legends, poetry and nonsense rhymes, adventure-quest narratives, as well as children's original poetry and fiction. Examines critical views of children's books. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1158 (IAI H5 901)
    Bible As Literature

    3 credit hours

    An analysis, interpretation and evaluation of such basic types of literature found in the Bible as the short story, ballad and song, drama, fantasy, poetry, and the worlds of satire and humor. Emphasizes the development of individual understanding and enjoyment. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1159 (IAI H9 901)
    Greek Mythology

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the mythology of Classical Greece (fifth century BCE) as it appears in narrative and dramatic forms. The myths and the ideas underpinning them are studied in relation to modern culture. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1160 (IAI H3 910D)
    Native American Literature

    3 credit hours

    Survey of Native American mythology, oratory, poetry, short fiction, nonfiction and the novel. Develops reading skills in analysis, interpretation and evaluation and examines values and themes common to Native American experiences. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1161 (IAI H3 910D)
    Multicultural Literatures of the U.S.

    3 credit hours

    Examines literary texts representative of one or more multicultural groups in the U.S., including but not limited to Hispanic, African-American, Asian-American, Middle Eastern, etc. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1165 (IAI H3 911D)
    Literature and Gender

    3 credit hours

    Studies literature centering on women's experience, identity construction, gender epistemology, and feminist philosophy and scholarship. The course also examines subject-boundaries of traditional discipline and literary canonization from interdisciplinary and culturally inclusive perspectives. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1800
    Special Project

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent (to be determined by the disciplines). This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One

  • English 1820
    Selected Topics I

    3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 1824
    Selected Topics in English

    2 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics in English with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (2 lecture hours)

  • English 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One. Consent of instructor is required.(1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • English 2100
    Intro to Writing/Reading Center Theory

    3 credit hours

    Experiential course designed to train students to tutor other writers and readers and to engage in self-reflective and meta-cognitive activities on their writing and reading. Includes writing, reading, observing, and practicing tutoring in the Writing and Reading Center. This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: English 1101 with a grade of B or better or equivalent and concurrent enrollment in English 1102 or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2126
    Modern English Grammar

    3 credit hours

    A systematic and rigorous survey of the structure of contemporary English. Also explored are usage issues (including problems with the sentence, punctuation and agreement) and their underlying sources (language change, language attitudes, and the notion of Standard English). Traces the effects of stylistic, regional and social variation on English usage. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2210
    Literary Journal: Prairie Light Review

    1 credit hours

    Applies editorial and publication techniques to produce college-district humanities magazine. Includes writing, photography, editing and business management. This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (2 lab hours)

  • English 2220 (IAI H3 912)
    British Literature to 1800

    3 credit hours

    A survey of representative works illustrating the development of British literature from its beginnings to roughly 1800, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts. Prerequisite: English 1101 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2221 (IAI H3 913)
    British Literature From 1800 Through the

    3 credit hours

    A survey of representative works illustrating the development of British literature from roughly 1800 to the present, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social and political contexts. Prerequisite: English 1101 or consent of instructor. (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2223 (IAI H3 914)
    American Lit From Colonial Period to Civ

    3 credit hours

    Surveys works of representative American authors in their literary, intellectual, social and political contexts from the earliest periods to the Civil War. Prerequisite: English 1101 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2224 (IAI H3 915)
    Amer Literature From Civil War-Present

    3 credit hours

    Surveys works of representative American authors in their literary, intellectual, social and political contexts from the Civil War through the present. Prerequisite: English 1101 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2226 (IAI H3 907)
    Masterpieces of World Literature

    3 credit hours

    Reading of novels, drama and short stories from different cultural backgrounds and from different historical periods. Emphasis is on fictional literary masterpieces important to a liberal education. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2227 (IAI H3 907)
    Modern European Literature

    3 credit hours

    Reading of major European writers of the 20th century in their individual and national contexts with emphasis on European thought and themes. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2228 (IAI H3 905)
    Shakespeare

    3 credit hours

    Involves reading and discussing various Shakespearean works, including six to nine plays. Lecture, discussion, recordings, films, oral readings or occasional student performances may be used to illuminate the material. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2250
    Introduction to Creative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Students discover and develop their writing talent in several genres. Students create original fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, and drama; experiment with various forms and styles; criticize and revise their own work; and read and examine the works of well-known writers for insight and inspiration. (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2251
    Fiction Writing

    3 credit hours

    A fiction writing course for students who want to develop their writing talents. Students examine elements of various forms of fiction and select and employ applicable techniques to their writing projects. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2252
    Poetry Writing

    3 credit hours

    A creative writing course for students who want to explore, discover and develop their poetic talents. Students write their own poetry, experiment with various poetic forms and styles, criticize and revise their own work, receive critical feedback, and read and examine the works of well-known poets for insight and inspiration. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2253
    Creative Nonfiction Writing

    3 credit hours

    An advanced writing course for students who wish to write freelance articles, essays or other nonfiction prose. Students work on one or more projects with the editorial assistance of the instructor. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2254
    Playwriting

    3 credit hours

    Introduces students to invention, criticism, and revision strategies that will encourage them to discover and develop their own voice and style in drama. Students write their own dramatic pieces, learn industry standards for play formats, experiment with various forms and styles, criticize and revise their own work, and receive critical feedback from others. Students read and examine the works of well-known playwrights for insight and inspiration. (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2255
    Screenwriting for Short Forms

    3 credit hours

    This writing course will engage students with invention, criticism, and revision strategies that will encourage them to discover and develop their own voice and style in screenwriting. Students write individual, isolated scenes and acts for various forms of screen formats; learn industry standards for screenplay formats; experiment with various forms and styles; criticize and revise their own work; receive critical feedback from others; and read and examine the works of well-known screenwriters for insight and inspiration. Credit cannot be given for both English 2255 and Motion Picture/Television 2022. (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2261
    Writing for Publication

    3 credit hours

    This course offers instruction in analyzing the publishing market including such publications as educational journals, business and industrial journals, general interest magazines, and book-length publications. Students aim their writing projects toward a particular market. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2262 (IAI H3 908N)
    Non-Western Literature

    3 credit hours

    Examines and analyzes literary texts representative of the Non-Western world, including but not limited to Latin America, South America, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and/or Oceania. Prerequisite: English 1101 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2271
    Postmodern Fiction and Film

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the conflicting ideas, texts, and products that define Postmodern fiction and film. Prerequisite: English 1101 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2800
    Special Project

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the Catalog for the discipline, while building upon academic knowledge and skills acquired in introductory-level classes. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent (to be determined by the disciplines). This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of more complex discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One

  • English 2820
    Topics in Literature

    3 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken three times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • English 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • English 2863
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)

    3 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 225 clock hours for three semester credit hours. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • English 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • English 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • English 2871
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • English as a Second Language 0441
    Academic ESL Reading I

    4 credit hours

    Beginning-level academic/professional reading and comprehension skills and strategies for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes skills/strategies to improve reading comprehension and speed, expand vocabulary and use reference resources. Course is intended for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on mandatory placement test. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category Four (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0442
    Academic ESL Reading II

    4 credit hours

    Intermediate-level academic/professional reading comprehension skills and strategies for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes developing the critical reading and academic skills required to satisfy students' academic or professional needs. Course is primarily intended for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0441 with a grade of C or better. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category Three (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0443
    Academic ESL Reading III

    4 credit hours

    Advanced-level academic/professional reading skills and comprehension strategies for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes using authentic texts to develop the critical reading and academic skills required to satisfy students' academic or professional needs. Intended for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0442 with a grade of C or better. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category Two (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0551
    Academic ESL Writing I

    4 credit hours

    Beginning-level academic/professional writing skills for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes writing well-formed, grammatical sentences and studying paragraph development. Focuses on recognizing spelling patterns for verbs and nouns, expanding vocabulary, generating original sentences in the six basic sentence patterns with correct punctuation, distinguishing topic sentences from supporting ideas and concluding sentences, and learning pre-writing techniques for paragraph development. Intended for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on mandatory placement testing (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0552
    Academic ESL Writing II

    4 credit hours

    Intermediate-level academic/professional writing skills for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes writing well-formed, grammatical paragraphs. Focuses on expanding the six basic sentence patterns through modification and compounding, using the writing process, organizing ideas into paragraph form, understanding elements of unity and coherence, and producing narrative, descriptive and expository paragraphs. Intended for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0551 with a grade of C or better or appropriate score on mandatory placement test (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0553
    Academic ESL Writing III

    4 credit hours

    Advanced-level academic/professional writing skills for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes writing well-formed, grammatical essays. Focuses on a review of sentence expansion and modification, the four steps of the writing process, developing research skills, and writing essays in a variety of rhetorical styles. Intended for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0552 with grade of C or better or appropriate score on mandatory placement test (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0661
    Academic ESL Grammar I

    4 credit hours

    Beginning-level academic/professional English grammar and sentence structure for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes the formal properties of the English language integrated with writing skills. Focuses on identifying sentence parts, complete sentences and fragments; subject/verb agreement; basic statement, imperative and question patterns; and simple present, present continuous, simple past and past continuous tenses. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on mandatory placement testing (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0662
    Academic ESL Grammar II

    4 credit hours

    Intermediate-level academic/professional English grammar and sentence structure for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes the formal properties of the English language integrated with writing skills. Focuses on the English system of articles, phrasal verbs, constructions of coordination and modification, and future and perfect tenses. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0661 with a grade of C or better or appropriate score on mandatory placement test (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0663
    Academic ESL Grammar III

    4 credit hours

    Advanced-level academic/professional English grammar and sentence structure for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes the formal properties of the English language integrated with writing skills. Focuses on conditionals, passive voice, reported speech, verbals, emphatic constructions, performing multiple coordinating and embedding combinations, and varying tenses in discourse. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0662 with a grade of C or better or appropriate score on mandatory placement test (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0771
    Academic ESL Listening/Speaking I

    4 credit hours

    Beginning-level academic/professional listening and speaking skills necessary for formal contexts for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes aural/oral discourse used in decision-making and problem-solving tasks. Focuses on such areas as listening to college lectures and taking notes, participating in group discussions, pronouncing English sounds correctly, producing English stress and intonation patterns, and preparing short oral presentations. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on mandatory placement test. (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0772
    Academic ESL Listening/Speaking II

    4 credit hours

    Intermediate-level academic/professional listening and speaking skills necessary for more formal contexts for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes longer aural/oral discourse used in decision-making and problem-solving tasks. Focuses on areas such as listening to extended college lectures and taking notes, applying a range of strategies for participating in group discussions, pronouncing English sounds correctly, producing English stress and intonation patterns, and incorporating techniques to enhance oral presentations. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and who have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0771 with a grade of C or better or appropriate score on mandatory placement test. (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0773
    Academic ESL Listening/Speaking III

    4 credit hours

    Advanced-level listening and speaking skills and strategies for professional contexts for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes analytical skills necessary for assessing alternatives, finding creative solutions, and presenting outcomes effectively. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0772 with a grade of C or better or appropriate score on mandatory placement test. (4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0820
    Selected Topics

    2  to 4 credit hours

    Academic/professional English skills for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes critical thinking in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Develops language and research skills necessary for success in the academic or professional setting. Intended for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English. Topics will vary by term offerings. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on mandatory placement tests or consent of instructor. (2 to 4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0881
    Academic ESL Language and Culture I

    2  to 4 credit hours

    Beginning-level academic/professional aural/oral skills and strategies for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes developing the skills and strategies necessary for social conversations and formal transactions, building an understanding and appreciation of U.S. culture, and enhancing cross-cultural communication. Focuses on such areas as making introductions, initiating, sustaining and ending conversations, explaining personal tastes and preferences, and using the telephone. Addresses the linguistic and cultural instructional needs of non-English-language-background students. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on mandatory placement test or consent of instructor. (2 to 4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0882
    Academic ESL Language and Culture II

    2  to 4 credit hours

    Intermediate-level academic/professional aural/oral skills and strategies for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes open-ended and problem-solving tasks to generate original conversation within the context of real-life, authentic situations. Focuses on such areas as communicating cross-culturally; making suggestions, expressing feelings, making inquiries, offering/accepting invitations, gifts and apologies; explaining problems; and agreeing/disagreeing. Addresses the linguistic and cultural instructional needs of non-English-language-background students. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0881 with a grade of C or better or appropriate score on mandatory placement test (2 to 4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0883
    Academic ESL Language and Culture III

    2  to 4 credit hours

    Intermediate-level academic/professional aural/oral skills and strategies for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes open-ended and problem-solving tasks to generate original conversation within the context of real-life, authentic situations. Focuses on such areas as communicating cross-culturally; making suggestions, expressing feelings, making inquiries, offering/accepting invitations, gifts and apologies; explaining problems; and agreeing/disagreeing. Addresses the linguistic and cultural instructional needs of non-English-language-background students. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESL-0881 or consultation with English as a Second Language adviser prior to enrollment (2 to 4 lecture hours) -- Advanced-level academic/professional oral/aural skills and strategies for students whose first or primary language is not English. Emphasizes more complex transactions and conversation management skills in the context of decision-making and problem-solving tasks based on real-life, authentic situations. Focuses on such areas as communicating cross-culturally; agreeing, disagreeing and compromising; participating in discussions; explaining complex situations, and reporting sequences of events. Addresses the linguistic and cultural instructional needs of non-English-language-background students. Intended primarily for students who hold a high school certificate or its equivalent and have previously studied English in the United States or their native countries. May be taken up to three times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. Prerequisite: English as a Second Language 0882 with a grade of C or better or appropriate score on mandatory placement test. (2 to 4 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0950
    ESL Literacy I

    1  to 6 credit hours

    Introduces basic ESL Literacy communication skills including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on aural/oral skills. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required. (1 to 6 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0951
    ESL Literacy II

    1  to 6 credit hours

    Completes basic ESL Literacy communication skills including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on aural/oral skills. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 6 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0952
    Low Beginning ESL

    1  to 6 credit hours

    Introduces beginning ESL communication skills, including listening, speaking, reading and writing. Grammar concepts introduced. Emphasis continues on aural/oral skills. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 6 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0953
    High Beginning ESL

    1  to 6 credit hours

    Continues Beginning ESL communication skills including expanded basic listening, speaking, reading and writing. Continues the study of grammar and structure. Emphasis primarily on aural/oral skills. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 6 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0954
    Beginning ESL III

    1  to 5 credit hours

    Completes beginning ESL communication skills necessary to function in the United States. Continues the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Introduces grammar and structure. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor (1 to 5 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0955
    Low Intermediate ESL

    1  to 6 credit hours

    Introduces Intermediate ESL communication skills necessary to function in the U.S. including listening, speaking, reading and writing. Continues the study of grammar and structure. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This class can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 6 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0956
    High Intermediate ESL

    1  to 6 credit hours

    Completes Intermediate ESL communication skills necessary to function in the U.S. including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Continues the study of grammar and structure. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This class can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 6 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0957
    Advanced ESL I

    1  to 5 credit hours

    Introduces advanced ESL communication skills necessary to function in the United States, including listening, speaking, reading and writing. Continues the study of grammar and structure. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor (1 to 5 lecture hours)

  • English as a Second Language 0958
    Advanced ESL II

    1  to 5 credit hours

    Completes advanced ESL communication skills necessary to function in the United States, including listening, speaking, reading and writing. Continues the study of grammar and structure. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor (1 to 5 lecture hours)

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