Course Search Results

  • Accounting 0430
    Bookkeeping - a Practical Focus

    2 credit hours

    Introduction to the accounting cycle of a service company, emphasizing basic accounting concepts. (2 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 1110
    Accounting Procedures

    3 credit hours

    The accounting cycles of service organizations and merchandisers focusing on the recording of business transactions and the preparation of financial statements for such organizations. Includes specific accounting concepts relating to current assets, long-term assets, current liabilities, payroll and the operations of corporations. (3 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 1140
    Financial Accounting

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to financial accounting concepts. A study of the accounting cycles of service organizations and merchandisers emphasizing the recording of business transactions, and the preparation of financial statements for such organizations. Emphasis is also placed on the accounting principles relating to the measurement, valuation and reporting of assets, liabilities and equity, and related internal control considerations. (4 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 1150 (IAI BUS 904)
    Managerial Accounting

    4 credit hours

    An introduction to managerial accounting and cost concepts. A study of the accounting cycle of manufacturers emphasizing the recording of business transactions relating to the manufacture of inventory and the preparation of financial statements. Emphasis is also placed on analysis of cost behavior, budgeting concepts, standard cost systems and variance analysis, and the use of accounting information to make decisions. Prerequisite: Accounting 1140 or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 1175
    Microcomputer Accounting

    2 credit hours

    Introduction to a general ledger software package on a microcomputer. Keyboarding and mouse skills are required. Prerequisite: Accounting 1110 or Accounting 1140 or consent of the instructor (2 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2200
    Income Tax Return Preparation

    3 credit hours

    Individual income tax return preparation emphasizing the completion of basic tax returns. Resources are provided under the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program which is administered by the Internal Revenue Service. Prerequisite: Accounting 1140 or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2205
    Federal Taxation I

    3 credit hours

    Federal income tax concepts relating to individuals and sole proprietorships. Prerequisite: Accounting 1150 or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2206
    Federal Taxation II

    3 credit hours

    Federal income tax concepts relating to corporations, partnerships, S-corporations, trusts and exempt organizations. Also includes the tax consequences of international transactions. Prerequisite: Accounting 2205 or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2241
    Intermediate Accounting I

    4 credit hours

    In-depth study of the theory and concepts of accounting emphasizing the income statement and balance sheet and the accounting for cash, receivables, inventory, plant assets, intangible assets, current liabilities, and contingencies. CIS 1221 recommended. Prerequisite: Accounting 1140 or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2242
    Intermediate Accounting II

    4 credit hours

    In-depth study of the theory and concepts of accounting emphasizing the measurement and valuation of long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, corporate investments in securities, revenue recognition, postretirement benefits, leases, interperiod tax allocations, accounting changes, full disclosure, ratio analysis and the preparation and presentation of the statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: Accounting 2241 or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2251
    Cost Accounting

    4 credit hours

    In-depth study of methods used by managers for decision making, budgeting and performance evaluation. Emphasizes cost accounting systems and procedures for data accumulation and cost control. Prerequisite: Accounting 1150 or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2260
    Advanced Accounting

    3 credit hours

    In-depth study of the accounting and reporting issues related to consolidated financial statements with an emphasis on consolidation theory, procedures for eliminating various intercompany transactions, and accounting for business combinations. Other topics include partnership accounting, international operations and corporate insolvency. Prerequisite: Accounting 2242 or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2265
    Governmental & Not-For-Profit Accounting

    3 credit hours

    In-depth study of governmental and not-for-profit entity theory, practice and reporting issues. Emphasis on accounting principles relating to governmental agencies, colleges and universities, health care and not-for-profit organizations. Completion of Accounting 2241 is recommended prior to enrollment. (3 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2271
    Auditing I

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the role of the public accountant, professional standards, attestation and other assurance services, audit evidence and documentation, and reports on audited financial statements, with particular emphasis on the auditor's decision-making process by integrating coverage of the components of audit risk with tests of controls and substantive tests that relate to selected transaction cycles. Prerequisite: Accounting 2241 or Accounting 2242, or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2272
    Auditing II

    3 credit hours

    Further study of auditing and other assurance services emphasizing professional standards and ethics, legal liability of auditors, regulation of the public accounting profession, internal controls in information technology systems, the components of audit risk, tests of controls and substantive tests relating to selected transaction cycles, audit sampling applications, other services performed by auditors, and related reporting requirements. Prerequisite: Accounting 2271 or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2280
    Forensic Accounting-Fraud Examination

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to financial fraud including analysis of major fraud schemes, investigative strategies, and financial controls. Emphasis on detection and prevention of financial fraud in the organization. Completion of Accounting 2241 or equivalent is recommended prior to enrollment. (4 lecture hours)

  • Accounting 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Accounting 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career & Technical Ed). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Accounting 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Adult Basic Education 0700
    Reading Skills Development I

    3 credit hours

    Introduces basic word recognition and word attack skills including pre-reading skills, sight words, phonics skills and structural analysis skills; comprehension and advanced reading skills in relation to words, sentences, selections and sequence; specialized skills in locating and organizing information, reading maps, interpreting graphs, tables or diagrams; and the development of personal reading skills. Mandatory testing. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (3 lecture hours)

  • Adult Basic Education 0701
    Reading Skills Development II

    3 credit hours

    Reinforces and reviews basic word recognition and word attack skills including pre-reading skills, sight words, phonics skills and structural analysis skills; comprehension and advanced reading skills in relation to words, sentences, selections and sequence; specialized skills in locating and organizing information, reading maps, interpreting graphs, tables or diagrams; and the development of personal reading skills. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (3 lecture hours)

  • Adult Basic Education 0702
    Pre-GED Reading Skills I

    3 credit hours

    Reinforces and reviews word recognition and word attack skills of structural analysis; comprehension and advanced reading skills including deriving meaning from words, sentences, selections and identifying sequence; specialized reading skills including locating and organizing information, reading maps and interpreting graphs, tables or diagrams. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (3 lecture hours)

  • Adult Basic Education 0703
    Pre-GED Reading Skills II

    3 credit hours

    Introduces personal reading skills and reading in the social studies and science content area. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (3 lecture hours)

  • Adult Basic Education 0710
    Basic English Skills I

    3 credit hours

    Introduces basic English grammar and usage, spelling/vocabulary/dictionary use, capitalization and punctuation. Mandatory testing. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (3 lecture hours)

  • Adult Basic Education 0711
    Basic English Skills II

    3 credit hours

    Expands knowledge of English grammar, usage, and sentence structure, and includes composition of English paragraphs and essays. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Mandatory testing and consent of instructor is required (3 lecture hours)

  • Adult Basic Education 0720
    Basic Mathematical Skills I

    3 credit hours

    Introduces basic arithmetic skills including the fundamental operations with whole numbers, decimals, fractions and mixed numbers; verbal reasoning; and measurement systems. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (3 lecture hours)

  • Adult Basic Education 0721
    Pre-GED Mathematical Skills II

    3 credit hours

    Reinforces and reviews arithmetic skills including the fundamental operations with decimals, fractions, and mixed numbers; verbal reasoning; and measurement systems. Introduces percents, ratio and proportion, and charts and graphs. This course may be taken four times for credit; course does not count toward GPA/graduation and is non-transferable. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (3 lecture hours)

  • Adult Secondary Education 0840
    Citizenship Preparation

    2 credit hours

    Intended for individuals preparing for naturalization and for successfully completing the oral interview and written test required for U.S. citizenship. The course provides an overview of significant historical events; facts and concepts of federal, state and local government; current political, governmental and social information; and explanations of United States' culture and institutions. The naturalization process and the One Hundred Questions developed by the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services (BCIS) are also covered. This course may be taken four times for credit. This course can only be taken on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (2 lecture hours)

  • Air Conditioning 1100
    Refrigeration Principles

    3 credit hours

    Basic laws of matter, fluids, gases, compression systems, refrigeration controls, refrigerants and components. Included are Pressure Enthalpy (PH) charts, evaporators, condensers, metering devices, compressors and an introduction to service refrigeration systems. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 1105
    Intro to Safety, Materials & Equipment

    3 credit hours

    The use and care of hand tools, special tools used in air conditioning, pipe fitting, copper tubing, brass fitting, flaring, soldering and safety. Orientation to job entry specification and occupational opportunities. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 1108
    Refrigerant Certification

    1 credit hours

    Environmental handling, refrigerant equipment and certification types are covered. Federal Government requires all individuals who open a system or container holding refrigerant to be certified. EPA refrigerant certification test given. (1 lecture hour)

  • Air Conditioning 1110
    Introduction to Controls

    3 credit hours

    Practical study of electricity, electrical hardware, and electrical test instruments that are used in the heating, air conditioning and refrigeration industry. Basic electricity, circuits, schematics, power distribution, electrical components and motors. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 1112
    Residential Refrigeration

    3 credit hours

    Analysis of the operation of refrigeration systems, leak detection, leak repair, charging, component, replacements, schematic reading and troubleshooting domestic refrigerator and window air conditioning units. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1100, Air Conditioning 1105, and Air Conditioning 1110 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 1161
    Introduction to Sheet Metal

    2 credit hours

    Basic fitting layouts. Various types of seams, elbows and triangulation used in constructing various square and round fittings. Drawing and fabrication of the fittings are required. (4 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 1180
    Introduction to Heating

    5 credit hours

    Gas combustion, venting, operation of a heating unit, electrical circuitry, zoning and accessories. Servicing, troubleshooting and repairing mechanical and electrical components, and proper installation of heating units. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1110 or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 1186
    Introduction to Hydronics

    2 credit hours

    Principles of steam, water, piping and their components are covered with respect to boilers, water treatment and electrical circuitry. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1180 or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 1187
    Central Heating Plants

    3 credit hours

    Theory of large boiler systems operation. Low and high pressure boilers, air handling equipment, heat exchangers, pumps, controls, water treatment, accessories, service and preventive maintenance are covered. Field trips to central heating plants are included. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1180 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 1827
    Selected Topics

    1 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (1 lecture hour)

  • Air Conditioning 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (2 to 8 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2201
    Residential Air Conditioning

    3 credit hours

    Split and package air-conditioning systems, proper installation, operation, servicing, repair of mechanical and electrical components, and air treatment. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1100, Air Conditioning 1105 and Air Conditioning 1110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2202
    Commercial Air Conditioning

    3 credit hours

    Commercial air-conditioning equipment, mechanical and electrical components, service repair, operation, capacity control, proper installation, zone control, and psychometrics. Includes mechanical components of rooftop heating systems and start-up procedures. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1180 and Air Conditioning 2201 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2205
    Heat Pumps

    2 credit hours

    Theory of the refrigeration cycle with respect to heat pumps and electrical heat. Includes mechanical and electrical operation, service, repair and proper installation. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1100, Air Conditioning 1105 and Air Conditioning 1110 or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2210
    Commercial Refrigeration

    5 credit hours

    High, medium, and low temperature refrigeration application, operation of mechanical and electrical components, service and repair of electrical circuitry, and mechanical components, capacity controls, walk-ins, reach-ins, ice machines, supermarket refrigeration equipment, refrigeration piping, heat reclaim, and start-up procedures. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1100, Air Conditioning 1105 and Air Conditioning 1110 or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2220
    Installation

    3 credit hours

    Proper installation of heating, air conditioning and refrigeration systems, piping, duct installation, electrical circuitry, and accessories. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1100 and Air Conditioning 1105 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2225
    Troubleshooting Systems

    3 credit hours

    Systematic evaluation of system pressure, temperature, compressor efficiency, mechanical, and electrical components. Study of system performance on live equipment. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 2202 and Air Conditioning 2210 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2230
    Advanced Controls

    3 credit hours

    Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) control systems in commercial buildings, including electric, pneumatic, electronic and Direct Digital Control (DDC) controls. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1100, Air Conditioning 1105 and Air Conditioning 1110 or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2231
    Direct Digital Control of HVAC Systems

    3 credit hours

    Examines state-of-the-art heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC) Direct Digital Control (DDC) systems. Emphasis is on system configurations, applications, installation, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 2230 with a grade of C or better or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2232
    Energy Audits/Economics

    2 credit hours

    Purpose, objectives and mechanics of the energy audit and economic processes include the audit procedures, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration systems, lighting, auxiliary equipment, energy conserving, cost-saving measures and analysis techniques that are necessary for evaluation of energy projects. After successful completion of the course, students are eligible to take the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Refrigerant Certification Test. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2236
    Central Cooling Plants

    3 credit hours

    Theory of centrifugal, absorption and screw systems, minor repairs, service, preventive maintenance of pumps, air-handling equipment and controls are covered. Field trips to central cooling plants are included. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1100, Air Conditioning 1105 and Air Conditioning 1110 or equivalent. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2240
    Load Calculations and Duct Design

    5 credit hours

    Techniques and procedures necessary to evaluate residential and commercial heat loss, heat gain and duct layout design. Heat transmission, infiltration, R-value, U-valve, duct analysis, duct sizing, duct and register location and selection, and equipment sizing and selection. (4 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2241
    Industrial Air Conditioning Design

    3 credit hours

    Design and application of industrial air conditioning, psychrometrics, load calculation, equipment selection, ventilation, duct design, pipe design, and automatic controls: Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1100, Air Conditioning 1105, Air Conditioning 2240 and Mathematics 1100 or Mathematics 1115 (or college equivalent) or qualifying score on the mathematics placement test, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2250
    System Balancing

    2 credit hours

    Covers air-delivery equipment, duct distribution, duct pressure, cubic feet per minute, fluid flow, pumps, piping, refrigeration systems, testing instruments, and fine tuning of systems. Prerequisite: Air Conditioning 1100, Air Conditioning 1105 and Air Conditioning 1110, all with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2260
    Heating and Air Conditioning Contracting

    3 credit hours

    Principles of Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVACR) contracting. Includes estimating, vendor selection, and sales development in the context of starting and growing an HVACR business. (3 lecture hours)

  • Air Conditioning 2860
    Internship (Career &Technical Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Air Conditioning 2862
    Internship (career & Technical Ed)

    2 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Air Conditioning 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career & Technical Ed). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Anatomy & Physiology 1500 (IAI L1 904L)
    Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology

    4 credit hours

    Essential principles of human anatomy and physiology are presented, including basic chemistry, cell and tissue studies, and an overview of all the body systems. Intended as a survey course for certain allied health and social service programs, and as a general natural science course. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Anatomy & Physiology 1551 (IAI L1 904L)
    Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    4 credit hours

    First semester of a two-semester sequence dealing with the structure and function of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. Includes the study of cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Course is intended to be an alternative to Anatomy & Physiology 1571; credit toward graduation will be granted for Anatomy & Physiology 1551 or Anatomy & Physiology 1571, but not for both. Biology 1151 is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Anatomy & Physiology 1552
    Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    4 credit hours

    Continuation of the study of the structure and function of the human body and the mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. The endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems, as well as the concepts of development, metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance, and acid-base balance are included. Course is intended to be an alternative to Anatomy & Physiology 1572; credit toward graduation will be granted for Anatomy & Physiology 1552 or Anatomy & Physiology 1572 but not for both. Prerequisite: Anatomy & Physiology 1551 or Anatomy & Physiology 1571, with a grade of C or better. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Anatomy & Physiology 1571 (IAI L1 904L)
    Anatomy and Physiology With Cadaver I

    4 credit hours

    First semester of a two-semester sequence dealing with the structure and function of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. Includes the study of cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Identification of anatomical structures on cadavers will be required in the laboratory. Course is intended to be an alternative to Anatomy & Physiology 1551; credit toward graduation will be granted for Anatomy & Physiology 1551 or Anatomy & Physiology 1571 but not for both. Biology 1151 is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Anatomy & Physiology 1572
    Anatomy and Physiology With Cadaver II

    4 credit hours

    Continuation of the study of the structure and function of the human body and the mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. The endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems, as well as the concepts of development, metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance, and acid-base balance are included. Identification of anatomical structures on cadavers will be required in the laboratory. Course is intended to be an alternative to Anatomy & Physiology 1552; credit toward graduation will be granted for Anatomy & Physiology 1552 or Anatomy & Physiology 1572 but not for both. Prerequisite: Anatomy & Physiology 1551 or Anatomy & Physiology 1571, with a grade of C or better. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 3 lab hours)

  • Anatomy & Physiology 1820
    Selected Topics I

    3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics in anatomy and physiology with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anatomy & Physiology 1821
    Selected Topics II

    3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics in anatomy and physiology with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Anatomy & Physiology 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within anatomy and physiology to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Anatomy & Physiology 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Anatomy & Physiology 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Anatomy & Physiology 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Anatomy & Physiology 2871
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Anthropology 1000 (IAI S1 900N)
    Introduction to Anthropology

    3 credit hours

    Introduces students to the four primary sub-fields of anthropology as well as the applications of anthropological work in addressing domestic, international, and cross-cultural issues and dilemmas. Emphasis is placed on the complementary and interrelated nature of archaeology, cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1100 (IAI S1 901N)
    Cultural Anthropology

    3 credit hours

    Introduces cultural anthropology as a subfield of anthropology that studies contemporary societies. Focuses on patterns in human behavior and on culture as the way people live and adapt to their various situations. Emphasis is on the diversity of cultural patterns throughout the world and the essential humanity of all people. Examples from a wide variety of cultures are presented in a variety of formats. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1105 (IAI S1 904D)
    Practical Anthropology

    3 credit hours

    Concentrates on how concepts, techniques and information from anthropology can be applied to helping people solve their problems and improve their lives. Emphasizes the relevance of anthropology to development issues and to concerns of many career fields such as business, medicine, social work, teaching and management. Course examples are drawn from diverse parts of the world. Individual project(s) relate to students' interests and/or careers.(3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1110
    Business Anthropology

    3 credit hours

    Holistic approach to economic systems examining how family, language, religion, class, education and gender roles inform economic practices. Emphasis on the diversity of cultural patterns throughout the world and the essential humanity of all people. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1130 (IAI S1 904D)
    People and Cultures of the World

    3 credit hours

    An introductory exploration of specific populations and cultures in different areas of the world today, focusing on interaction between a society's culture and its environmental, demographic, and historical conditions. Emphasis on the areas of subsistence, religion, and/or urbanization/complexity. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1200 (IAI S1 903)
    Discovering Archaeology

    3 credit hours

    Introduces archaeology as a subfield of anthropology that studies humanity's prehistory, history and present through the study of material remains and the archaeological record of human development. Emphasis is placed on what archaeologists do and the science of archaeology. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 1210
    Ancient Civilizations and Societies

    3 credit hours

    Explores the emergence of human societies and civilizations through archaeology. This course covers major landmarks in the development of human civilizations including the emergence of humankind, the development of agriculture, urbanism, and the high civilizations of antiquity. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1300
    Language and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Introduces Linguistic Anthropology as a subfield of Anthropology that explores how humans communicate. Focuses on language as the basis for social relations and culture. Emphasis is on the similarities and differences of human languages, the cognitive basis for language, the formation of communication systems, and the adaptive use of those systems in human societies. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1400 (IAI S1 902)
    Race, Sex and Human Evolution

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the field of physical anthropology, sometimes known as biological anthropology. Topics include the scientific foundations for studying race and human variation as well as popular misconceptions about human genetic diversity; primatology, including a survey of living primate forms; evolutionary theory, the fossil record and the development of humans; and humanity's place in world ecology. Introduces forensic anthropology. Includes laboratory work centered on these topics and skeletal biology. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 1410
    Evolution of Human Sexual Behavior

    3 credit hours

    Introduces human sex and sexuality from an evolutionary perspective. Explores how evolution has shaped the bodies, behaviors, and nature of modern humans as sexual beings. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1800
    Special Project

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.).

  • Anthropology 1820
    Selected Topics I

    3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 2100
    Introduction to Anthropological Methods

    4 credit hours

    Introduces anthropological methods with an applied focus to study contemporary societies and addresses contemporary problems. Utilizes ethnography, case studies, cultural mapping interviews, textual analysis, observations, participant observation, ethology, focus groups, and other techniques. Students develop a keen awareness of cultural issues in research. Prerequisite: Anthropology 1000, Anthropology 1100, or Anthropology 1105, with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (4 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 2150
    Culture and the Mind

    3 credit hours

    Introduces an evolutionary approach to the understanding of how human nature was shaped in the Pleistocene Era and continues to have profound influences on contemporary behavior. Focuses on the evolution of traits that serve as the basis for human adaptations imposed by the needs related to subsistence, safety, sex, and sociality. Emphasis is on the role of culture and language as selective pressures in their own right, the evolved mental domains that have served our species, the basis for these adaptations, and the biological platforms for these systems. Anthropology 1101 and Anthropology 1125 are recommended. Prerequisite: Psychology 1100 with a grade of D or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 2200
    Introduction to Anthropological Methods

    4 credit hours

    Provides an overview of the major methods of field work and research design in anthropology and related social and behavioral sciences. Students will analyze one or more topics using appropriate qualitative and quantitative methodological techniques. Some field work may be required. (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2210
    Field Experience/Applied Anthropology

    4 credit hours

    Introduces students to experiential-based learning of anthropological methods with an applied focus to study contemporary societies. Provides a framework for implementing the methods designed in the Introduction to Anthropological Methods course. Prerequisite: Anthropology 2100, with a grade of C or better and Business 1100, with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor (8 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2240
    Field Work Archaeology

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the techniques and theory of field archaeology through actual excavation of prehistoric and historic field archaeological sites and work with actual artifacts and other materials from those sites. Check the anthropology lab or semester listings of the timing and location of archaeological field schools. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2245
    Laboratory Methods in Archaeology

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the techniques and theory of archaeological lab analysis through the examination of materials from various sites in both the United States and other regions of the world. Individual projects may center around particular interests. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2400
    Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

    3 credit hours

    Introduces students to the identification of the bones of the human skeleton and techniques used to recover and treat forensic material. Topics include use of skeletal remains to identify age at death, biological sex, ancestry and stature; identification of traumatic, pathological and occupational markers on the skeleton; and determination of time since death and post-mortem damage. Includes discussion of ethics involved in forensic anthropology. Prerequisite: Anthropology 1101 or Anthropology 1125 or Criminal Justice 1142 or Criminal Justice 2230, with a grade of C or better or equivalent, or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Anthropology 2800
    Special Project

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30 percent but not to exceed 70 percent. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor

  • Anthropology 2820
    Advanced Selected Topics I

    3 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Anthropology 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Anthropology 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Anthropology 2871
    Internship - Advanced (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Transfer). Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Arabic 1101
    Elementary Arabic I

    4 credit hours

    Develops the ability to speak, understand, read, and write Arabic in a cultural context. For beginning students with no prior experience in the language. (4 lecture hours)

  • Arabic 1102
    Elementary Arabic II

    4 credit hours

    Continues the development of the ability to speak, understand, read, and write Arabic in a cultural context. For students who have successfully completed Arabic 1101 or equivalent or one year of high school Arabic. Prerequisite: Arabic 1101 or one year of high school Arabic or consent of instructor. (4 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 1100
    Introduction to Architecture

    3 credit hours

    Introductory study of the theory, history, and principles, and of architecture. Basic principles of architectural analysis, criticism, and aesthetic principles. Includes the relationship of architecture to the cultures that create it specifically in terms of the societies' economic, political and social organization, technological abilities, and spiritual values. Also discusses ethical responsibilities of design professionals especially as environmental stewards. (3 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 1101
    Basic Architectural Drafting

    3 credit hours

    Fundamentals of hand drafting and architectural conventions. Includes use of tools, lettering, dimensioning, drafting techniques, and frame construction vocabulary and technology. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1111
    Building Materials

    4 credit hours

    Characteristics, properties, and applicable standards of construction materials. Includes all major structural, enclosure and finish materials and standards for materials. Emphasis on the process of material selection and evaluation including sustainability concepts and criteria.(4 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 1121
    Architectural Design Communication

    4 credit hours

    Introduction to 2-D and 3-D communication and presentation techniques as used in architecture. Includes orthographic, paraline, perspective and freehand drawing techniques and procedures. Covers basic model building and the use of drawing as a problem abstraction and diagramming technique. (1 lecture hour, 6 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1130
    Blueprint Reading

    2 credit hours

    A survey of graphic construction drawings including paper and electronic mediums. Students learn to interpret construction drawings for residential, commercial and industrial structures. Includes architectural and engineering documents and graphic conventions. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1131
    Introduction to Architectural Design

    4 credit hours

    Basic design theories and strategies related to the development of spatial concepts in architectural design, including composition, color, form, relationship of elements, and development of 2-D and 3-D design projects. Emphasis on concept generation and evaluation. Prerequisite: Architecture 1100 and Architecture 1121 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (2 lecture, 4 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1141
    Construction Methods I

    2 credit hours

    Survey of basic construction techniques and procedures through project applications. Topics include concrete, masonry, wood frame and lightweight steel construction methods and materials. Includes tool selection and use. Course is not designed to give students trade skills in these areas. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1211
    Basic Computer-Aided Drafting-AutoCAD

    3 credit hours

    Fundamentals of Computer-Aided Drafting and Design (CADD). Introduces concepts, techniques and procedures necessary to facilitate a basic functional understanding of AutoCAD. Prerequisite: Basic technical drafting course, drafting experience or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1212
    Adv Computer-Aided Drafting-AutoCAD

    3 credit hours

    Advanced functions of Computer-Aided Drafting and Design (CADD). Includes advanced commands, system customization, and Internet applications. 3-D modeling and rendering will be introduced. Prerequisite: Architecture 1211 with a grade of D or better or equivalent or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1301
    Introduction to Construction Management

    3 credit hours

    Construction management as a project delivery system emphasizing the roles and responsibilities of construction managers, contractors, sub-contractors, owners and design professionals, and how they relate to each other. Fundamentals of project administration from pre-construction planning to project close-out through the study and review of case studies. Includes an overview of cost estimating, meetings, project safety and scheduling. (3 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 1411
    Introduction to BIM-Revit

    3 credit hours

    Fundamentals of Building Information Modeling (BIM) as a construction documentation system. Introduces concepts and features of BIM. Includes software structure and features, modeling and editing techniques, and sheet creation and organization. Recommended: Architecture 1101 and Architecture 1211 or architectural drafting class or experience or consent of instructor. (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1412
    Advanced BIM-Revit

    3 credit hours

    Advanced concepts of Building Information Modeling (BIM). Focuses on applying BIM software to develop a set of construction documents. Simulates project development and documentation. Prerequisite: Architecture 1411 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or consent of instructor (1 lecture, 4 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1820
    Selected Topics in Architecture I

    3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit. as long as different topics are selected. (3 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 1821
    Selected Topics in Architecture II

    3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Architecture 1827
    Selected Topics in Architecture

    1 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. (1 lecture hour)

  • Architecture 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 4 lecture hours, 2 to 8 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2102
    Detailing and Construction Documents

    4 credit hours

    Study of commercial construction systems and techniques. Project based class which simulates the process of a project's development in an architectural office. Includes analysis and applications of codes, regulations, and standards, material review and selection, construction detailing and documentation, and office standards and procedures for computer aided drafting and design (CADD) application. Prerequisite: Architecture 1101, Architecture 1111 and Architecture 1211, all with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2103
    Steel and Concrete Construction

    4 credit hours

    Study of steel and concrete construction technology. Project based class which simulates the process of a project's development in an architectural office. Includes analysis and applications of codes, regulations, and standards, material review and selection, construction detailing and documentation, and office standards and procedures for computer-aided drafting and design (CADD) application. Prerequisite: Architecture 2102 with a grade of D or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2110
    Advanced Architectural CADD

    3 credit hours

    Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) class exploring topics specific to architectural firms' implementation and efficient use of CADD software. Includes CADD standards, software integration and customization, document formats, file management, and hardware requirements. Prerequisite: Architecture 1211 or equivalent or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2142
    Construction Methods II

    2 credit hours

    Survey of basic construction techniques and procedures through project applications. Topics include insulation, roofing, siding, installation of doors and windows, drywall, flooring and mechanical and electrical systems. Includes tool selection and use. Course is not designed to give students trade skills in these areas. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2150
    Basic Surveying

    2 credit hours

    Basic procedures, calculations and field data recording techniques used in surveying. Correct procedures for the use of surveyor's tape, engineer's level, and transit and rod to establish locations and elevations. This is not an appropriate course for someone seeking to become a licensed surveyor. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2201
    Architectural Design I

    5 credit hours

    Exploration of form and space of the built environment. Includes process of problem analysis and evaluation to generate concepts and develop solutions. Prerequisite: Architecture 1131 with grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (2 lecture hours, 6 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2202
    Architectural Design II

    5 credit hours

    Continuation of Architectural Design I. Problems involve larger scale, broader scope, and increased complexity. Advanced and digital presentation techniques will be used for presentations. Prerequisite: Architecture 2201 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (2 lecture, 6 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2203
    Introduction to Architectural Theory

    3 credit hours

    Traces the history of architecture and architectural theory from the Renaissance to the contemporary period through built projects, theoretical designs, and original writings of architects and others. Prerequisite: Architecture 1100 with a grade of D or better, or equivalent and English 1101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One. (3 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 2210
    Mechanical, Electrical, & Plumb Systems

    3 credit hours

    An overview of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems for buildings as used by architects and construction managers. Introduction to systems, equipment, design calculations, and drawings, standards, and conventions. Prerequisite: Architecture 1111 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2220
    Architectural Computer Modeling

    2 credit hours

    Computer graphics course using Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) and other software to create computer architectural models and presentations. Prerequisite: Architecture 1211 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 3 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2230
    Structural Systems

    3 credit hours

    An overview of components and concepts of structural systems in steel, concrete, and wood as used by architects. Includes conceptual design and detailing. Prerequisite: Architecture 1111 or Architecture 1211 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours

  • Architecture 2240
    Codes, Specifications and Contracts

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to the legal framework of construction. The scope and implications of codes, includes model codes and review of structure and organization of the International Building Code (IBC), the organization, structure, and role of specifications within construction documents, standard forms of contracts and contractual relationships. Prerequisite: Architecture 1111 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 2250
    Architectural Presentation and Portfolio

    3 credit hours

    Advanced architectural presentation techniques. Covers both hardcopy and digital product formats. Uses various 3-D modeling, digital presentation, digital publication and image enhancement software. Prerequisite: Architecture 1121 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or Architecture 1211 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2260
    Construction Estimating

    3 credit hours

    Basic procedures, calculations, and techniques used in construction cost estimating. Includes bidding procedures, different types of construction estimates and the appropriate procedures for each, and the process of quantity take-offs and cost calculations including equipment, overhead, and profit components. Computer applications to produce estimates and review of existing software titles. Prerequisite: Architecture 1111 or equivalent or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 2270
    Construction Scheduling

    3 credit hours

    Construction scheduling as a tool for project delivery and documentation, from project conception to building occupancy. Emphasizing the interrelationship of the trades and sequencing of the work during the construction process. Includes schedule composition and schedule implementation for project success. Prerequisite: Architecture 1130 and Architecture 1301 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 2413
    BIM Management-Revit

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to Building Information Modeling (BIM) applications for the construction industry. Recommended course: Architecture 2260 or concurrent enrollment in Architecture 2260. Prerequisite: Architecture 1130 with a grade of C or better or equivalent and Architecture 1301 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or consent of instructor (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2820
    Advanced Selected Topics Architecture I

    3 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor (3 lecture hours)

  • Architecture 2823
    Advanced Selected Topics Architecture IV

    3 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor (6 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2840
    Experimental/Pilot Class

    1  to 6 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline. This course is used to pilot a proposal for a permanent discipline course. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (1 to 6 lecture hours, 1 to 12 lab hours)

  • Architecture 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Architecture 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Art 1100 (IAI F2 900)
    Introduction to the Visual Arts

    3 credit hours

    Overview of the visual arts as transmitters of cultural, humanistic and aesthetic values. Global selections from the remote past to the present examined in thematic studies including visual elements and design principles, motivations for art making within cultural and historical contexts, material processes, and issues in world art. Designed to encourage visual literacy and develop analytical skills of the non-art major. Field trip may be required. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Art 1101
    Drawing I

    3 credit hours

    Introductory studio course with emphasis on accurate observation and representation, informed use of drawing materials, and awareness of two-dimensional art elements. Course includes vocabulary development and reference to historic models of drawing. (6 lab hours)

  • Art 1102
    Drawing II

    3 credit hours

    Continued exploration of the nature, scope, and principles of drawing. Further development of critical thinking and visual problem solving abilities. Exploration of additional concepts, materials, and processes of visual art. Completion of Art 1151 is recommended prior to enrollment. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with grade of C or better or equivalent (6 lab hours)

  • Art 1105
    Introduction to Studio Art

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to art methods and materials. Includes two-dimensional and three-dimensional design concepts introduced through a variety of media. May include painting, drawing, ceramics, sculpture, computer art, jewelry, and printmaking. Field trip may be required. Course is intended for non-art majors. No previous art background is required. (6 lab hours)

  • Art 1140
    Introduction to Ceramics

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to the materials, techniques, and concepts in ceramics. Includes handbuilding, throwing, surface treatment, and kiln loading. Course is intended for the general interest student. (6 lab hours)

  • Art 1151
    Two-Dimensional Foundations Studio

    3 credit hours

    Studio course exploring the principles and elements of 2-D art and design. Development of visual awareness, critical thinking and problem-solving abilities. Emphasis will be placed on concepts, materials and processes associated with the principles of visual perception. (6 lab hours)

  • Art 1152
    Three-Dimensional Foundations Studio

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the design and construction of three-dimensional objects and environments, including an exploration of the principles and elements of three-dimensional art and design. Use of tools in projects designed to explore the relationship of form to function, building processes to materials, and transformations of architectural space. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in Art 1101 or consent of instructor (6 lab hours)

  • Art 1185
    Book Arts

    2 credit hours

    Introduction to the theory, history and processes in book making. Traditional and non-traditional formats will be explored with emphasis on the relationship between form and content. (4 lab hours)

  • Art 1250
    Introduction to Jewelry

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to the materials, techniques and concepts in jewelry and metalsmithing. Includes forming, casting, surface treatment and soldering. Course is intended for the general interest student. (6 lab hours)

  • Art 1800
    Special Project

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Special project courses in Art cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the catalog for the Art discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific Art topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in Art. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30% but not to exceed 70%. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of Art concepts, theories, principles, and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.) This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are chosen.

  • Art 1823
    Selected Topics in Art

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college Class Schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Will vary with topic (1 to 3 lecture hours, 2 to 6 lab hours)

  • Art 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required (2 to 8 lab hours)

  • Art 2201
    Life Drawing I

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to drawing the figure from observation. Emphasizes accurate portrayal of the undraped figure. Various drawing materials will be used to investigate anatomical study and pictorial composition. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2202
    Life Drawing II

    3 credit hours

    Continued exploration of life drawing concepts, materials, and processes concentrating on the undraped figure. Emphasis will be placed upon accurate anatomical proportions and portrayal of sculptural solidity. Individual expression and use of visual metaphors will be developed. Prerequisite: Art 2201 or consent of instructor (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2211 (IAI F2 901)
    Art History I: To 1300

    3 credit hours

    Chronological survey of Western visual culture from the remote past through the High Gothic. Examines major examples of painting, sculpture, architecture and the decorative arts within their historical, social, political, cosmological and aesthetic contexts. Field trip may be required. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Art 2212 (IAI F2 902)
    Art History II: 1300-1750

    3 credit hours

    Chronological survey of Western visual culture from the Proto-Renaissance through the Late Baroque. Examines major artists and regional styles within their historical, social, political, cosmological and aesthetic contexts. Field trip may be required. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Art 2213 (IAI F2 902)
    Art History III: 1750 to Present

    3 credit hours

    Chronological survey of Western visual culture from the Rococo period through the transnational Postmodern era. Examines major artists, art styles and aesthetic theories within their historical, social, political and aesthetic contexts. Field trip may be required. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Art 2214 (IAI F2 903N)
    Introduction to Non-Western Art

    3 credit hours

    Overview of the contexts and aesthetics of the indigenous visual cultures of Africa, Asia, Australia, Oceania and the Americas. Selections include painting, sculpture, architecture, ceramics and fiber arts from the remote past to the present. Field trip may be required. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Art 2215
    History of Adornment

    3 credit hours

    A survey of the history of jewelry and metals in a social and cultural context. This course introduces students to representative examples of historical world jewelry and metals. Using a combination of lectures, slides, videos, readings, and group discussions, the course explores the roles of personal adornment, jewelry, and metals in terms of major historical periods, worldwide cultures, important events, and famous personages. Attention will be paid to contemporary work and international art jewelry, including design, and fabrication issues. Class discussions will focus on the function of jewelry and its presentation and display on the body. (3 lecture hours)

  • Art 2216
    Introduction to Philosophy of Art

    3 credit hours

    Philosophical theories of the creative process in art. Emphasis on form, significance, emotion, reality, association, and chance in the realm of aesthetic judgment and criticism. Credit cannot be given for both Philosophy 2250 and Art 2216. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours)

  • Art 2221
    Painting I

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to painting methods using various materials such as acrylic, watercolor, and oil paint. Emphasis in paintings will be on technical skill sets, originality of content, and an understanding of art history as contextual and referential. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better or college equivalent or concurrent enrollment in Art 1101. (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2222
    Painting II

    3 credit hours

    Further exploration of painting skills with continued development of individual expression. Formal and conceptual rigor is emphasized. Prerequisite: Art 2221 with a grade of C or better or college equivalent (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2231
    Sculpture I

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to basic sculptural materials, tools, equipment, processes and concepts associated with wood and plaster sculpture. Basic three-dimensional design principles are addressed throughout the course. An informed context is provided by the study of the work of current and historic sculptors. Studio safety is considered at all times. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in Art 1101 (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2232
    Sculpture II

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to basic sculptural materials, tools, equipment, processes, and concepts associated with steel sculpture. Large-scale installation or site-specific sculpture will be investigated in group activities. An informed context will be provided by the study of the work of current and historic sculptors. Studio safety will be considered at all times. Prerequisite: Art 1101 and Art 2231 with a grade of C or better or equivalent (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2235
    Introduction to Design Objects

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to object design methods and research skills. Emphasis is placed on the development of fundamental skills such as design ideation, 2D drawing and rendering, hands-on model making and material experimentation, and design presentation techniques. In addition to examining an object's function, use and form, students will analyze the cultural ideas, values and beliefs that are embedded within objects we create and put to use in our lives. Recommended course: Art 1152 Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better or college equivalent (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2241
    Ceramics I

    3 credit hours

    An introductory studio consisting of conceptual and technical processes in ceramics. Exploration of functional design and sculpture utilizing basic clay construction methods, surface treatment and kiln loading. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in Art 1101 (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2242
    Ceramics II

    3 credit hours

    Continued exploration of sculptural and functional ceramics. Students will build competency in the entire ceramics process, from idea development through presentation of finished form, including clay use, surface application, and kiln firing. Prerequisite: Art 1101 and Art 2241 with a grade of C or better or equivalent (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2243
    Student Art Gallery

    2 credit hours

    Examination of the process by which galleries and museums create exhibitions, from planning and research through exhibition design, selection process, installation, communication with the audience, accessibility, and evaluation. Includes management of student art gallery on campus. This course may be taken four times for credit. Prerequisite: Art 1100 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or consent of instructor. (4 lab hours)

  • Art 2251
    Jewelry/Metalsmithing I

    3 credit hours

    A studio introduction to basic jewelry and metalsmithing processes, materials, tools and equipment. Basic techniques such as sawing, soldering and cold connecting sheet metal (silver, copper, brass) are introduced. Craftsmanship, health work habits and studio safety are emphasized. Historical and contemporary aesthetics and concepts in art metals and jewelry design are examined. Prerequisite: Art 1101 or concurrent enrollment in Art 1101 (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2252
    Jewelry/Metalsmithing II

    3 credit hours

    Continued exploration of jewelry/metalsmithing processes, materials, tools, and equipment. Techniques introduced include stone setting, lost wax casting, enameling, and etching. Focus on proficiency in the selection, use, and manipulation of materials as well as a mastery of the processes involved. Contemporary trends in jewelry/metalsmithing are examined. Craftsmanship, healthy work habits, and studio safety will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Art 2251 and Art 1101 (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2266
    Computer Art I

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the use of computer hardware and two dimensional software in the creation of fine art. Topics will include the creation and manipulation of direct-drawn, formula-generated, and photographic images. Techniques will include the use of a stylus, a scanner, and a printer for use with bitmap and vector based software. Note: This is not a graphic design computer course. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better or college equivalent or concurrent enrollment in Art 1101. (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2267
    Computer Art II

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the use of three dimensional software using one or more modeling, animation, and editing software packages. Topics will include organic and geometric modeling, surface rendering, animation, CNC, and video production in the creation of film, installation, and sculptural artforms. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better or college equivalent and Art 2266 with a grade of C or better or college equivalent (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2275
    Intaglio Printmaking

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the intaglio printmaking processes. Topics include etching, engraving, drypoint, aquatinting, and photo-etching in creating editions of fine art prints. Emphasis is placed upon mastery and the creative use of these printmaking techniques. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better or college equivalent (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2276
    Lithography

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to the lithographic printmaking process. Topics include the use of crayon, tusche, photocopy and drawing transfers, and multiple plate printing in creating editions of lithographic prints from both metal plate and stone. Emphasis is placed upon mastery and the creative use of these printmaking techniques. Prerequisite: Art 1101 with a grade of C or better or college equivalent (6 lab hours)

  • Art 2800
    Special Project

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Special project courses cover topics not otherwise covered by general education courses and other courses in the catalog for the discipline. These courses require direct experience and focused reflection in an in-depth study of a specific discipline topic and/or the critical analysis of contemporary issues in the discipline. They are targeted to self-selected students with an interest in the subject matter and involve active participation. The course delivery incorporates an experiential component of no less than 30% but not to exceed 70%. This experiential component may include field studies, interdisciplinary learning, and/or the practical application of discipline-related concepts, theories, principles, and methods with a specific focus. All courses require an orientation session to deliver academic and experiential information (syllabus, academic requirements, field preparation, logistics, etc.). Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of the instructor.

  • Art 2820
    Advanced Selected Topics I

    1  to 3 credit hours

    Advanced exploration and analysis of selected topics with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: At least one course in the discipline or consent of instructor (1 to 3 lecture hours)

  • Art 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Art 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Art 2870
    Internship (Transfer)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Automotive Service Technology 1040
    Automotive for Non-Majors

    3 credit hours

    Overview of personal auto maintenance principles. Topics include proper maintenance for longevity, resale value, and safety; how vehicle systems work; and how to complete some light vehicle repairs. (2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 1110
    Engine Design and Operation

    3 credit hours

    Design, operation and troubleshooting procedures of the gasoline engine. Includes disassembly, identification and inspection of parts, use of service manuals, safety and shop procedures. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 1120
    Manual Drive Train and Axles

    4 credit hours

    Inspection, construction, nomenclature, diagnosis, disassembly and assembly of manual drive train components including clutch, manual transmission, driveshaft, universal joint, constant velocity joint, final drive, manual transaxle, transfer case and locking hub assemblies. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 1131
    Automotive Basic Electricity

    4 credit hours

    Automotive circuit construction emphasizing meter usage. Analog and digital meters and oscilloscopes are stressed. Practical approach to reading wiring diagrams, service manuals and manufacturers' repair procedures, including diagnosis of selected vehicle accessory circuits. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 1140
    Suspension, Steering and Alignment

    3 credit hours

    Front and rear suspension systems for front-wheel drive and rear-wheel drive vehicles. Steering systems, including rack and pinion, are diagnosed and repaired. Wheels and tires and their effect on handling and ride. Wheel alignment angles are measured and adjusted. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 1232
    Automotive Engine Electricity

    4 credit hours

    Starting and charging systems, including starting and charging components. System testing for both no-start and preventive maintenance conditions and charging system construction and on-car testing. Construction, operation, function and testing of ignition systems of current vehicles, including electronic ignition, distributorless ignition and oscilloscope testing. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1131 with a grade of C or better or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 1240
    Braking Systems

    4 credit hours

    Automotive braking systems including rotor and drum machining, caliper and wheel cylinder rebuilding, wheel-bearing service, brake pad and shoe replacement, and diagnosis and service of anti-lock systems. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1131 with a grade of C or better or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 1250
    Automotive Air Conditioning and Heating

    4 credit hours

    The servicing of automotive air conditioning and heating systems, including refrigerant recovery and recycling, compressor clutch and seal repair, performance testing, and system diagnosis and repair. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1131 with a grade of C or better or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 1261
    Engine Controls & Emissions I

    4 credit hours

    General Motors engine computer controls, including inspection, testing, and diagnosis of sensors, fuel injectors, emission controls, and fuel delivery by using scan tools, electrical meters, and exhaust gas infrared analyzers. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1131 with a grade of C or better or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 1840
    Independent Study

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline to meet individual student-defined course description, goals, objectives, topical outline and methods of evaluation in coordination with and approved by the instructor. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (1 to 4 lecture hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 2120
    Automatic Transmission

    3 credit hours

    Inspection, construction, nomenclature, diagnosis, disassembly and assembly of automatic transmissions and automatic transaxles, including fundamental operation and construction, inspection and rebuilding of apply devices, planetary gear sets, oil pumps, valve bodies and one-way clutches. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One or consent of instructor (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 2133
    Automotive Body Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Selected automotive electrical accessories will be emphasized. Diagnose and repair causes of poor, intermittent, and/or no operation of accessories, such as windshield wipers and washers, power windows, power seats, power mirrors, power antennas, cruise controls, window de-icers, automatic headlights, power door locks, vehicle networks, and security systems. Completion of Automotive Service Technology 1261 is recommended prior to enrollment. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1131 and Automotive Service Technology 1232, both courses with a grade of C or better or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (1 lecture hours, 4 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 2162
    Engine Controls and Emissions II

    4 credit hours

    Computerized engine control systems common to Ford and Daimler Chrysler vehicles. Testing of sensors, components, systems, circuits, on-board diagnosing, scan-tool use, and fuel injectors. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1131, Automotive Service Technology 1232, and Automotive Service Technology 1261, all with a grade of C or better or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (3 lecture hours, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 2220
    Advanced Automotive Drivetrains

    3 credit hours

    Inspection, construction, operation, and diagnosis of automatic and manual transmission, transaxle, transfer case, and driveline electrical components and controls. Includes fundamental theory, operation, construction, inspection, and diagnosis of switches, sensors, solenoids, motors, and control devices. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1120, Automotive Service Technology 1131 and Automotive Service Technology 2120 with a grade of a C or better or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (1 lecture hour, 4 lab hours).

  • Automotive Service Technology 2280
    Automotive Service

    6 credit hours

    Trade experience for the advanced automotive student. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1110, Automotive Service Technology 1120, Automotive Service Technology 1140, Automotive Service Technology 1232, Automotive Service Technology 1240, Automotive Service Technology 1250, Automotive Service Technology 1261 and Automotive Service Technology 2120 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (1 lecture hour, 10 lab hours).

  • Automotive Service Technology 2345
    Automotive Hybrid Technology

    2 credit hours

    An overview of hybrid vehicles. Terminology, safety requirements, theory of operation, and modification to other automotive systems are reviewed. Inspection and diagnosis of hybrid systems using specialized tools. Also examined is the impact of hybrid technology on the automotive industry. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 2364
    Automotive ScanTool Usage & Exploration

    1 credit hours

    Hands-on practice and experience with multiple manufacturer-specific and generic OBD2 ScanTools. Students will explore the many different functions of original equipment and aftermarket ScanTools for diagnosis and programming capabilities on multiple vehicle systems. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1232 or equivalent or Automotive Service Technology 1261 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One. (2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 2365
    Intro to Diesel Fuel Systems & Emissions

    2 credit hours

    A generic course designed to increase the knowledge of diesel engine design, fuel control systems, and emission controls. Topics of discussion include direct and indirect injection, mechanical fuel systems, unit injection systems, electronic diesel control, hydraulically actuated electronic unit injectors (HEUI), common-rail fuel systems and related emission control devices. Prerequisite: Automotive Service Technology 1110 and Automotive Service Technology 1261 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One. (1 lecture hour, 2 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 2370
    A.S.E. Certification Analysis & Tech

    2 credit hours

    An integrative course teaching a higher level of skills to combine previous courses and introduce updates in technology to prepare for the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification exams. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (2 lecture hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 2840
    Experimental/Pilot Class

    1  to 6 credit hours

    Exploration and analysis of topics within the discipline. This course is used to pilot a proposal for a permanent discipline course. This course may be taken four times for credit as long as different topics are selected. Prerequisite: Course requires Reading Placement Test Score-Category One (6 lecture hours, 12 lab hours)

  • Automotive Service Technology 2860
    Internship (Career & Technical Ed)yCoop Ed/Internship Occup

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Course requires participation in Career and Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

  • Automotive Service Technology 2865
    Internship Advanced (Career & Tech Ed)

    1  to 4 credit hours

    Continuation of Internship (Career and Technical Education). Course requires participation in Career & Technical Education work experience with onsite supervision. Internship learning objectives are developed by student and faculty member, with approval of employer, to provide appropriate work-based learning experiences. Credit is earned by working a minimum of 75 clock hours per semester credit hour, up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: 2.0 cumulative grade point average; 12 semester credits earned in a related field of study; students work with Career Services staff to obtain approval of the internship by the Associate Dean from the academic discipline where the student is planning to earn credit.

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